put wall insulation in wrong

Heard the "paper side" goes toward the inside of the house wall. Replacing the siding, I put it with the paper towards the outside.
HOW BIG A PROBLEM IS THAT?
thanks
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Hi

Sorry to say, this can be a huge problem . What must not happen is that warm air can enter a colder room or enter the insulation so the moisture can condensate , now all dependent of outdoor and indore temperture and how much water is in the indore air beside how easy it is for indore air to enter a dead room , the dameage will vary, but you are asking trouble and somone before you know what trouble, realy you shuld check some of the places as othervise insulation get wet and don't work or wood start to get soaked and rot. Check out how easy it will be to do it over and consider the risk not having it the right way around. All your choice but don't forget about it. P.C.
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Foil vapor barrier insullation has the foil surface to keep humidity (moisture) into the house. The outer (cold) part of the insullation can condense moisture out from the indoor air, and the fiberglass can get soggy.
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Christopher A. Young
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It depends on where you live. If you live in an area that has air-conditioning running 10 months a year and heat one month a year, you have it the right way. If you live where you heat 8 months a year and it is damp all year long, you have a problem.
If the area where you live is marginal, you might be able to get by with a couple of coats of interior paint that includes a vapor barrier. It is not perfect, but it may add enough. The problem is it is going to be difficult to determine if you are ok, until damage is done. You also should not consider using a humidifier and you want to make sure you do everything you can to eliminate any moisture from inside your home.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Only a problem if you used silver foil insullation. And then the silver "vapor barrier" goes towards the house. If it's paper stuff, oughta not be a problem.
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You need to know the construction of the wall and the climate before you can say it won't be a problem. If all the other vapor barriers and water barriers are where they belong, then the extra paper probably won't hurt. But if there is no vapor barrier on the interior, and it is a cold climate, then he is in for big trouble.

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Ray wrote:

Depending on where you live, it is either no problem at all (humid areas in the south) or a huge problem (cold areas in the north).
Matt
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Or if you live in the middle, either way's a problem ;)
P
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ray) wrote in message

As Mr. Meehan says, the location of the vapor barrier depends on climate. The dew point - the location where temperature and humidity cause water vapor to condens - shouldn't happen inside the wall for obvious reasons.
TB
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net (Tom Baker) wrote in message

I agree, also, with Mr.Whiting. I posted before he joined the discussion. TB
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Very simply, the water vapor carries a lot of heat. If that vapor gets into the wall, it will continue to head outside to equalize the lower humidity. But on its way, it will be chilled as it goes through the wall. Finally reaches its dew point, becomes water, gets stopped by the vapor barrier, and drizzles down, inside the insulation, and settles at the sill plate. My invitation to you is to put on a few coats of vapor barrier paint, seal all wall penetrations, such as outlets, doorways, that sort of thing. Assure excellent bathroom ventilation. I suggest a vent fan with a humidity sensor. That is, if you're likely to do a fair amount of heating. Houses had the same sort of situation when they put tar paper on the outer part to cut down on air infiltration. And oil-based paint was notorious for blistering. That was because water was trapped behind it was warmed by the sun and expanded, and the softened paint was pushed outwards as a bubble.

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Thanks for all the replies.
I just pulled the plywood off and redid it all. Hadn't sided yet.
We're in the PNW, so the climate is relatively mild.
With a 83 year old farm house, I have 2x4 framing @ 24" OC. I used R13 paper batted from the the Depot.
Agian, thanks.....
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ray) wrote in message

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You could have sliced the vapor barrier, many times, with a box cutter. Good task for a person with a lot of frustrations, now that carpet beating has given way to the vacuum cleaners.

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You did it right, Ray, to avoid future problems. The moisture barrier always goes toward the living space in the PNW. (not sure that insulation manufactures don't specify that application for all climates)
Ray wrote:

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