Purchasing a circular saw

I need to purchase a circular saw. I just need a basic middle of the road quality model. I like to purchase good quality items that with proper care and maintenance will last a long long time.
I am just an average do-it-yourselfer so nothing with all the bells and whistles is needed.
Any recommendations as to brand/model/features/durability/etc would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Bob
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My FIL bought all three of his son-in-laws the DeWalt DW364. It's a lot of saw. Hopefully it's what you're looking for.
http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail.asp?productID$5
The Ranger
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The Ranger wrote:

my life time and kids will inherit them. I have spare trigger switches because brake is hard on switch(arcs). My idea of tools, buy the best you can afford, keep it long time and you'll swear less as well when you're using them, LOL!
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It's all personal preference. I've owned many and used other people's saws and I prefer my Porter Cable to any of them.
Red
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Regardless of brand, get one where you can see the blade without leaning over the saw. My cordless Makita is like that and that feature is a must-have. (for a right-handed user, the blade is to the left of the motor) I don't know why other saws don't do this. Some do, but all should.
Consider a cordless too, as they are much lighter. More expensive, but easier to maneuver. I have both, and the corded unit hardly gets used.
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[snip]

If my drills are any indication, this is a true paradigm... I just never thought about it with any of my other hand-helds.
The Ranger
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On May 22, 4:53am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I own and use both -- corded circular saw (Porter-Cable) and cordless (DeWalt).
The corded saw is better for most uses -- mainly because it is more powerful and runs at constant speed. However, there's nothing like the cordless when I need to make a quick cut and the corded saw is still on the truck -- just grab the cordless, make the cut, and be done with it.
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I own and use both -- corded circular saw (Porter-Cable) and cordless (DeWalt).
The corded saw is better for most uses -- mainly because it is more powerful and runs at constant speed. However, there's nothing like the cordless when I need to make a quick cut and the corded saw is still on the truck -- just grab the cordless, make the cut, and be done with it. I agree, corded saws and drills are better for a long project. But for a quick job I grab cordless.....
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On May 22, 6:11am, "Kickin' Ass and Takin' Names"

That is the post I was going to write, except that I would have added that I'm right-handed and my Porter-Cable is a left blade saw. Being able to see the cut-line without leaning over the saw is really nice.
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Kickin' Ass and Takin' Names wrote:

I'll second that. Cordless is great for small repair jobs or where you only have one or two cuts to make or holes to drill, and stringing a cord would be a pain. But when you are doing production work, esp in thick or hard material, corded is definitely the way to go. Love my cordless drill, but if I'm screwing down deck boards or the like, it gets tired real fast. Never bothered to buy a cordless saw, since I don't do field work any more. Anything I work on any more, there is an outlet within 50 feet of where it is flat enough to set up sawhorses.
-- aem sends...
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Id put B&D and Skill at the bottom, unless its the worm drive, get one with a lazer, HDs Ridgid brand has lifetime warranty, buy 120v not battery.
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Bob wrote:

Monitor Craigslist for a couple of weeks. It's easy to find a 20-year old Craftsman for $10.00 (if it's lasted twenty years, it'll probably last another twenty).
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On Wed, 21 May 2008 17:09:04 -0700, Bob wrote:

Get one with an electric brake. When you release the power switch, the blade stops quickly. Also find one comfortable to hold and use. Some saws are awkward.
Buy the best you can afford and be happy. Inferior tools don't last and soon become a pain to use. Working with tools should be enjoyable and not tedious.
--

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Franz Fripplfrappl
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Instead of getting one that will last a long time, for a few bucks more you can get one that last a couple of lifetimes with proper care and maintenance. I have a DeWalt, among others, that I really like EXCEPT for the shoe. Whoever designed that thing probably had never used a saw in their lives. Hint, get a saw with a FLAT shoe, no ridges on the bottom.
--
I\'m JC and I approved this message.

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Bob wrote:

I would try to buy something with two sealed ball or roller bearings (one at each end of the shaft) because sleeve bearings wear out much faster. If you push and pull on the blade bolt and feel any play, then the saw has only sleeve bearings. It seems that saws with ball/ roller bearings start at around $90-100, but Sears used to have one for just $75.
Try holding the saw horizontally and vertically to feel how comfortable it will be. Also do this with the blade at 45 degrees because some saws become awkward to hold or will even pinch your hand then.
I'd avoid cordless, unless you have to work where there's no AC power or in a moist environment. A very good corded tool often costs less than a so-so cordless, and you don't have to fuss with batteries. I have only one cordless tool, an 18V Ryobi drill, bought for $40 on close-out at Home Depot, with two batteries, but I use my corded drill a lot more.
The $99 Home Depot Ridgid circular saw is supposedly very good and has a lifetime warranty.
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