Pumping Oil Out Of Lawnmower Engine?

Page 2 of 2  
I'm curious about your concerns over using good PTFE products in automobiles. Early products with cheap PTFE's and poor particle size quality control were terrible for automobiles and such cheap products still exist. But I am under the impression that the high quality modern additives are fine for auto engines, auto oil filters, etc.
I'm not try to start any battles; I'm just interested in your concerns about using such additives on a well broken-in auto engine.
Thanks, Gideon
=================== Joseph Meehan wrote in message ... Gideon wrote:

Nice trick. I would have to use that, or something similar.

PTFE should not be a problem in mowers, but I would not use it in a modern automobile engine.

-- Joseph Meehan
Dia's duit
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why would you want to put impurities like PTFE products, sometimes known as "Snake Oil" into a good engine? Today's oils by themselves give the best protection.
If you want to "baby" an engine use a good synthetic like Mobil 1. Conventional oils use viscosity improvers to get multi-grade oils. The problem with them is that they are not good lubricants.. Synthetics do not thin as much as they get hot and do not need to add viscosity improvers.
You might want to read up on Oil:
http://www.chris-longhurst.com/carbibles/engineoil_bible.html
http://www.nightrider.com/biketech/oilinfo1.htm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gideon wrote:

The original problems were two fold. First they could and did cause damage. The second part is they did not work. It is just does not help in an automobile engine.
Now if I see someone telling me they fixed it and I can now use it. I must question the honesty of the whole message. I have yet to see and good evidence that the stuff has any benefit. I have seen many misleading (that is putting it nicely) advertisements for the stuff. I doubt if anything has changed.
It is a product without a need. Just use a good synthetic if you really want to do something that works.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also.. on Briggs & Stratton web site.. they spell out not to use multi viscosity oil due to the high heat of air cooled engines vs water cooled car engines... Oil and oil type products don't like to be exposed to temperatures outside their favorite ranges..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wrong: B&S recommends Multi-grade Synthetics are good for all temperatures:
http://www.briggsandstratton.com/display/router.asp?DocIDd066
I will add that they are far superior than single grade oils.
There is a big difference between conventional multi-grade and synthetic.
Conventional uses viscosity improvers to obtain mult-grade whereas synthetic does not need them. Synthetics do not thin as much as they get hot.
You might think of it this way. A synthetic is a single grade oil that does not thin as much as it gets hot. Or you might think of it as a single grade that does not get as thick as it gets cold. Remember that all oils thin as they get hot.
Therefore a synthetic is really a straight weight that does not get as thick as it gets cold.
A 5W30 and 30 straight weight have the same viscosity at 100C (212F). A 5W30 and a 5 straight weight have the same viscoisity at 0C (32 F).
A 5W30 is thicker at 0C than it is when it gets hot. A straight weight 30 conventional is much thicker at 0C.
Which brings up another advantage of synthetic. Since a 5W30 synthetic does not thin as much when it gets to 100C it will continue to not get as thin as it gets even hotter.
Synthetics hold up much better under heat than conventional therefore are much better for use with hot air cooled engines.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I stand corrected.. the biggest thing I missed/forgot was the "non-synthetic multi-viscosity" from the following text copied from that link you posted.. which is the one I had seen earlier..
" CAUTION: Air cooled engines run hotter than automotive engines. The use of non-synthetic multi-viscosity oils (such as 5W-30 or 10W-30) in temperatures above 40F (4C) will result in higher than normal oil consumption. When using a multi-viscosity oil, check oil level more frequently."
It's the "non-synthetic" multi vis that they don't recommend above 40 F outside air temp (or at least say to expect to burn oil)
That's the reason we've got to read behind one another here... ( I do like the way that they show owners manual, parts breakdown online in .pdf format.. I wish all companies would do this..) Chuck..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

temperatures:
synthetic
does
grade
as
thick
does
as
Yeah, I do the same type of reading.
It just stood out for me because I have used only synthetics for years. Way back when Mobil 1 first came out I started using it in my cars and trucks. Pulling a trailer over 13000 foot mountain passes I would be down almost a quart of oil. When I opened the filler cap fumes would come out. The stuff was vaporizing. I even tried 10W50. Switched to 5W20 Mobil 1 (That was the only weight available at that time). My oil usage almost disappeared.
Then one day went to change the oil in my mower. Only thing I had available was Mobil 1. Thought it over and came to the above conclusions, that it was equivalent to a single weight oil except it did not get a thick when cold and it doesn't get at thin when extremely hot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some walk behind mowers have a drain plug. I just put two buckets about a foot apart, lift the mower up. Drain pan under the mower, and then lay on my back to get at the drain plug with a wrench.
Some models, tipping it over is also pefectly valid.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
True, tipping the mower is OK to do if there isn't a drain plug or it won't come out.
Only caveat is, when you turn the mover over, position it so the spark plug doesn't point downward during the tip. You can end up letting the oil into places that will make it awfully hard to get started. The oil systems is NOT sealed on most lawn mower engines, plus oil can seep in between the rings in an older engine.
Pop
--
Let someone else do it
I'm retired!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ive worked on some honda mowers that had no drain plug and the manual said to drain out of the dipstick tube. i dont think you get it all out tipping or removin the drain plug.many shops are goin to the suction method, but i have to tip the mower to get the blade offf so i pull the drain plug if it has one and let it drain while sharpening the blade.. lucas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could try an oil extractor. These are great. Use din marine applications, also used for autos. Try www.jerrybleach.com for oil extractors.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't say what make of engine your lawnmower has, but tipping it over is exactly what some manufacturers recommend. Most lawnmowers also have a drain plug underneath, within a few inches of the blade shaft.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.