PTO pressure washer?

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On 01/07/2015 3:19 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote: ...

Hydraulic systems pump _always_ supplies pressure, the _cylinders_ are either double-acting or single-acting. There is no "suction"; the two-way valve applies pressure to the other side of the cylinder ram, there's no "OR" there.
We added an additional double-spool control on an old M here 65 year ago or so (altho they're all long gone, now, the M's were what I got my start on as a kid for a year or two before the 400 and the Allis and Case arrived in '59-60 time frame, the first 4000-series Deere in '62-63 iirc).
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

This little tractor has 2-way to both the front blade and the mower deck , I can lift the front end off the ground with the front blade - but if I push the lever all the way forward the blade floats . I have a double-acting cylinder , but I don't think it's big enough to work well as the piston diameter is only like 1.5" . I think the 2-way action is actually a function of the spool valve you choose . This isn't likely to happen soon , I'll probably save up and buy a used splitter when I get too old to do it manually .
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Snag



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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I don't know a lot about tractors other than I've spent enough time on one to never need to do that again, but I have done quite a bit of work with industrial hydraulics. It was all about pressure. The suction side of the pump only connected to the reservoir and was fairly sensitive to restrictions. A cavitating pump is not a good thing. With an up-acting press, you pumped it up. The weight of the cylinder and platen would return it to the open position after the valve released the pressure on the piston and vented the cylinder back to the tank. With a down-acting press, gravity might help filling the volume if you used a prefill valve, but then you built pressure with the pump. To get the ram back up, you pressurized the underside annular ring of the cylinder and vented the other oil back to the tank. In other words there were single and double acting cylinders, but you were applying pressure, not sucking oil out.
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So that's what those controls are called! I was wondering that.
Thanks for the info. I learned a little more about hydraulics. I never did much with them till a few years ago when I had to power an old sickle mower off my Farmall. I did get it to work, but had to disable the loader or both worked at the same time. I later just installed 2 ball valves to shut the loader off.
My Farmall M (Actually a "Super M") has been very reliable for a roughly 60 year old tractor. It's mostly used for plowing snow, pushing round bales around, and spreading gravel when I fix holes on my driveway. But Ive knocked down trees, did some building demolition, and much more.
However, without the loader, these tractors really cant do much!
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On 01/07/2015 2:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote: ...

Never had a Super M so not sure when they switched over; does it still have the single pull/push rod for the hydralics or does it actually have a hand station control/lever?
Hmmm...let me see what I can find in my "vintage tractors" book if it shows enough detail to see...well, unfortunately, no, the Super M was shot from too low an angle from the ground. But, I'd forgotten they had a relatively short time from of only '52-'54 which postdates the early M production from '39 so there's a moderate chance.
I don't know if the hydraulics were built as they currently are to simply add control spools or not, but it would be simple enough to add a standalone additional control so you do have both available.

Well, they planted and cultivated a _lot_ of crops, pulled hay balers/wagons, and myriads of other farm tasks for quite a long time.
A loader is a pretty late come-along item comparatively, albeit quite useful. In the days before large bales (and even the small square bale) there were string binders and pitchforks. :)
<
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppDO8kcM85s
We were still using one to shock feed rather than harvest grain through the 60s; dad finally sold it (still in working condition) during the auction when he retired in the mid-90s. As with others, A quick search found several videos but this one of the ones I looked at was the only one that was actually tying the bundles; the rest were either not tying at all or only partially successfully. Unfortunately, they didn't really get a got shot of the fingers and the twine handling/knot tying part here.
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On 01/07/2015 3:09 PM, dpb wrote: ...

<http://www.vinsonfarm.net/farmall_m_sm.html It'd been so long I'd forgotten a lot...looking at some of the pictures from the platform reminded me of a lot! :) The piece of straight pipe the headlights were mounted on, the little red rear "taillight", etc., etc., etc., ... all come back when I see it again.
We went to a 560 after the 400 which I never drove much; it unfortunately, turned out to be a less-than-successful machine; just not enough "guts" for the larger equipment were beginning to use. The rear end went out pretty early; Dad had it rebuilt once but it only lasted another couple of crop years and was going again so got rid of it for the first Deere (a 4020, the first green on the place as grandfather and dad neither one could stand the "johnny-pop" sound.
I did most of my row crop work on a little Allis-Chalmers D17; my brother copped out of the rowcrop work and did most of the flat ground. I preferred having more to do in driving straight row and all rather than just go 'round and 'round so was fine with me... :)
<http://globalcarslist.com/photo/im/allis-chalmers-d-17/10/default.htm We added the A-C loader later after quit using it as a field tractor. It was a nice little tractor for the purpose with the low, wide stance. It is, however, too short/small for current day hay moving as it doesn't have the height to reach the top row of a current semi-trailer. Even the 4440 Deere w/ the 148 loader that is present loader tractor is just barely able; you have to be certain to get the bale at the bottom to get the two over the drive wheels up there...mot of the newer loaders are more adapted for the purpose w/ longer reach. Neighbor's got a little Kubota not much bigger than the old Allis was and it's got more reach than the 4440 because was made for the job even though it's a lot lighter/less HP.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com writes:

We used a Farmall M to run the threashing machine for years. A super-C and a B were used to gather the shocks.
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The Super M is darn near identical to the regular M. It has a little more horse power. It has the same single push pull rod for the hydraulics. I am not aware of anything different on the Super M other than the little extra HP.
Where it lacks, is no 3 way hitch, and no LIVE PTO. I can run a small square hay baler, but not my hay mower. The mower works but constantly plugs up, because when I release the clutch, the mower stops, and that is what causes the plug up. The mower works fine. I just pay a neighbor to bring his bigger tractor, and mow it with my mower.
Someday Id like to get one of the later Farmalls with the Live Hyd and 3 way, but I may not farm much longer, so it's proabely just easier to pay the neighbor. I only bale about 9 acres, so it's not a big deal. But I do get enough hay from those 9 acres to feed my small herd for half the winter. After that I have to buy hay.
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On 01/07/2015 11:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote: ...

I didn't remember the PTO; the book here says some of the later Super M's had live hydraulics but don't think it mentioned the PTO. We didn't use PTO off the M's much at all altho did use the belt for a couple choppers and grinder and the ensilage blower for filling silo.
The Allis also had the problem; we had a little 6-ft rotary for it for just around the feedlots and barnyard mowing; did have to remember about it while using it, indeed.
There are a couple outfits making 3-pt attachments for the M's; not much you can do about the PTO... :(
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