property with "no" water

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Or you can just take the $50k to a casino and save yourself a lot of time and trouble.
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More to the point, that's what happens when you live in a state that prohibits homeowners from clearing brush around their property because it might damage the habitat of some mouse... never mind the fire risk to *human* habitat.
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Pico Rico wrote:

The noted 400' well does not "shut off" in a few minutes. What happens is that you a drawing down the standing water in the well casing in a few minutes and then waiting for the well to refill. This is a low yield well being pumped with a high flow pump, if you pumped at the well's actual yield rate it would pump continuously. Per your numbers it is producing ~50 gal in 40 min or about 1.25 gal / min consistently. That equates to 1,800 gal / day which is more than enough when coupled with a 1,500-2,000 gal cistern and proper pump controls.
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Nah they don't. Having worked fire investigation in a rural county (albeit about 30 years ago, but keeping up with my reading), they only care about what the FD can bring with them. They can give discounts if you have a big enough pond, live on a lake, have a deep river nearby, or other very close by water source. That is obviously fairly rare.
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Where else are they dumb enough to build that many houses in an area that is prone to such fires??? (grin).
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I would point to places such as No Name Key in the FL Keys. There are no water utilities there (yet, but that is another thread altogether-grin). You have houses that are bought and sold all the time with cisterns, solar or generators, (I am not sure what they do with waste water). All you would need to do is show that you have an adequate supply. You might lose a few potential buyers who don't want to mess with cisterns and pumps, but I'll lose a few potential buyers when I sell because they don't want to mess with the swimming pool.
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Ohioguy wrote:

Pump controllers are common for exactly this low yield well condition. They work by detecting when the pump runs dry based on current draw and then shutting it off for an adjustable time period (adjust based on well recovery rate), or of course they turn the pump off when the float switch in the cistern indicates it is full. The cistern feeds a second pump that feeds a normal pressure tank and is controlled by a regular pressure switch. Simple system, long tested, works great as long as the well is able to keep up with the total water demands overall.
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Ohioguy wrote:

Certainly there was no reason not to drill the first well a modest distance from the house. For the second it could have been laziness to not fully breakdown the drill truck and instead just move it a short distance to try again.
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Ohioguy wrote:

Forget the place with the questionable water supply, just buy your grandfather's 80ac and never look back. Nobody ever complains about having too much land, and in farm/ranch country you can just lease whatever portion of the property you aren't currently using to someone else for farming or grazing.
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That 240' will only hold about 240 gals of water 240' * 3.14 * (2.5/12)**2 * 7.5 = 240 gals
but cost maybe $20k to drill? A 1000 gal underground cistern would be a lot cheaper.
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That doesn't make sense either. A 5" diameter pipe will hold approximately one gallon per foot of length. If you want to store a hundred gallons of water, it's *far* cheaper to buy a 100- gallon tank than to drill 100 feet of well.

So the well drillers were idiots.
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On 08/04/2014 12:45 PM, Doug Miller wrote:
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Or the homeowner who told them what to do, more likely was the idiot and they just took advantage to get a check???
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or the well drillers decided, oh what the heck, let me comply with today's laws and seal the first 75 feet of the well, rather than loose my license and be fined.
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I liked the dowser idea. I am constantly amazed at the people who actually think someone can find water with a forked stick. Or bent coat hanger or other things of similar ilk.
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I was at one such dowsing. I know the area, and there is water everywhere. The dowser went back and forth, to and fro. Then he made an X in the dirt with his foot and said "drill here!". I pointed out that the County Code requires a 50 foot setback from roads and property lines, so the took his stick and without even looking said "well drill it over there".
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Doug Miller wrote, on Mon, 04 Aug 2014 11:08:52 +0000:

While you'll rarely find me defending the California nanny naturalists, they do require us to clear all brush within 100 feet of our homes.
We can get fined if we don't, and the insurance company requires it also.
We often get so much wood out of the deal that the county comes yearly to chip it for us.
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On 8/4/2014 7:17 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Does that help reduce the risk of fire damage?
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trader_4 wrote, on Mon, 04 Aug 2014 05:53:42 -0700:

Here, in "Silicon Ridge", the rock isn't all that hard to drill, I would think. It's Franciscan sediments. From fifty miles out in the ocean plastered against the continent, mixed in with granitic Salinian sediments from the southern Sierra Nevada mountains near Los Angeles carried north by the inexorable San Andreas right-slip fault movement.

Your medium pizza, which is darn good, costs, what? Maybe $15 right? Ours, out here, which stinks compared to yours, often costs over $30 for the same thing.
I have never figured this out yet. You never pay what *you* think it's worth; you pay what everyone *else* thinks it's worth.
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Pete C. wrote, on Mon, 04 Aug 2014 08:55:52 -0500:

That's exactly how mine works.
If the well has water, it pumps forever, until the water tanks indicate they are full (which would take 3 or 4 days to fill at 5 gallons a minute).
If the well can't produce the water, it runs until it runs dry, and then it shuts off for a settable prescribed time (usually 20 to 30 minutes).
In another recent thread, I shut off my wells for a few hours, and then turned them on individually. The "bad" well went dry in a minute while the good well went for about 20 minutes, at a bit more than 5 gallons per minute at the start and a bit less than 4 gallons per minute by the time it shut off with a precipitous drop in flow.
I only ran a couple of tests though, so, that's all the data I have.
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you always pay what you think it is worth, or you wouldn't pay it.
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