Property question

My parents just bought a newer home, and the previous owners added onto the house two years ago. When they did this, their backyard became very small.
They then hired guys to put in an underground sprinkler system, and sod to cover the 50 feet of property behind their house, which is actually Port property. I am surprised the Port let the previous owners get away with this.
My folks are older, and loved the smaller yard, so Dad cut off the underground sprinkler system to the back 50 yards of grass.
Here is the problem: He was going to build a fence, not necessarily to hide the old dryed up grass, but to create a boundary so it would not look like part of his yard which he failed to keep up. When digging, there is nothing but tons of rock.
Does anyone have any other ideas besides a fence?
Many thanks.
Corinne
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Corinne wrote:

So the "underground" sprinkler system is actually on top of rock but covered by sod? Sheesh.
Why not more rock? A small rock fence.
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A good idea in my opinion. It would be worth the expense to have the lot line surveyed if the corneres are not well marked. I would make sure the sprinkler system is severed at the lot line. TB
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This is Turtle.
Try this one out. Take a form and build a form to pour concrete in it about 1 foot wide and about 6 to 12 inches high all around the property where you want to put up the fence but this will be above ground or in the ground if possible in places. Take the post of your choice hurrican , wood, or what ever and put the post in the form of the concrete to be poured into place. The post will be set by the concrete when you pour the form full. Let dry and then use the post in the concrete to attach your fence. Now you will also have to expanion brakes in the run of concrete to allow for long runs of concrete.
I know you can add to it or change it some to fit your need. Here is a start.
TURTLE
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Corinne wrote:

Plants?
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Not sure what part of the country you're in, but I created a very attractive property border by planting Pyramidalis (Thuja occidentalis) about 4' apart. They grew into a beautiful tall 'no see through' hedge in just a few years.
The nice part about these is that they require almost no maintenance, except for yearly fertilizer, and watering only under the hottest conditions. ------------------------------------------

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Corinne wrote:

The answer to this question is: Why would the "Port" care? They get a happy neighbor and less maintenance.
My house backs up to a 200' wide high-voltage power line strip. The guy who mows the grass tells me he runs into all manner of things on the light company property: a LOT of gardens, fully-equipped baseball diamonds (with batting cage and benches), even an asphalted tennis court!
Works for him, just that much less grass to mow.
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How about a rock garden, seriously, with some plants that don't need watering. Or plant some shrubs that will grow to form a barrier. Or plant ivy; that seems to grow anywhere. Pat
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watering.
"Poison Ivy" would work great or even "Poison Oak"
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