Proper way to nail wood to bricks?

I need to reattach a piece of wood to a brick wall. (The piece of wood was nailed to the wall but somehow came loose.) What is the proper way to do it? Should I try to nail it back to the original holes or do I need to avoid them? If the latter, do I need to drill pilot holes before nailing? Is there a special kind of nail for this application? Thanks.
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All Thumbs wrote:

Hi, How about packing original hole with epoxy and drive nail before it drys up.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion. I provided some additional info in another message. The thing being attached is 1 of 3 small wood blocks on which window trim will hang. It's a repair job and I'm trying to reattach it like it was originally done.
I think epoxy will hold the nails very securely, but before I try that I need to figure out whether nails were used because they were *meant to be* easily removable.
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Why not drill a pilot hole and screw it into an anchor? Seems to me this might be more stable and give you less trouble in the long run.
If you must use nails, I'd suggest avoiding the original holes. Less chance for coming loose again.
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All Thumbs wrote:

More information, please. What exactly are you attaching? How much does it weigh fully loaded?
R
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RicodJour wrote:

The thing that's ultimately being attached is window trim. Not sure about the weight, but I suspect not much. The trim was attached to three approximately 4"x6" wood blocks nailed to an exterior brick wall.
I've never installed something like that before and don't know what is the usual/proper way to do it. I just assumed that whoever originally put that in place knew what they were doing.
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Depends on the use for the wood. You can use construction adhesive like Liquid Nails, you can anchor it using masonry/concrete anchors or you can screw it in using tapcon concrete screws.
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All Thumbs wrote:

It also depends on the brick and mortar. Some bricks do not hold well and you will need to secure things to the mortar joints some times the other way around. Given the choice, I go for the mortar as it is easier to repair.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Yes, I learned many many years ago that its best to go into the mortar than the bricks....the mortar "gives" a little more allowing you anchor to expand and grip better...
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All Thumbs wrote:

    Keep in mind that you can drill out a hole in the brick or mortar just large enough to insert a piece of wooden doll rod. The piece of doll rod then can accept a nail or screw. When the screw or nail is inserted, the doll rod will expand and tighten inside the drilled hole.
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the dowel plan works best... find a sliver or pc of dowel wood that fits into the holes, same depth, hammer it in , cut off excess with a chisel, insert a screw into the new wood. It will hold. Joe.
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