Proper Use of Extension Cords


Howdy,
Got a new generator and don't want to be unsafe with running cords.
My question(s) is, I have a 50' 10g 20 amp ex cord and want to know is it ok to connect a smaller gauge ex cord to this 10g 20 amp ex cord?
This cord has only the single female to plug into and I bought a 2' extender that has a 3 female receptacles. I also have a 100' cord but not as heavy duty as the 50' one.
How best and safest way to plug in my extension cords for maximum use?
The generator is a 6500 watt Honda, the starting wattage eludes me right now. It was used only one time for about 6 hours and the dude needed $$ to keep his divorce attorney up and running, so to speak. :)
Not planning on running anything bigger than the refrig/freezer, a small upright freezer, well pump (it's old and runs on 110), 3/4 fans during summer outages, 2/3 small lights and a small tv.
I know to unplug those appliances that don't need to stay plugged in all the time so as to allow the generator to furnish the power where its needed.
So, just looking for some experienced user to point me in the right direction pertaining to the proper use of extension cords from generator to house.
not at all interested in the backfeed scenario, seems to be a bit more hazardous to people and machines.
Thanks for any and all responses, advice and help.
Al
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Mr WithEveryShot wrote:

If the triple tap is at least 12g, I wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Any setup like that, you want to keep a close eye on the first time you use it, and feel the connections (with one hand stuffed down your pants), to make sure they aren't getting warm to the touch.
I need to do the same thing for my place- put the furnace and well pump on pigtails (I can run a cord up the stairs for the fridge), and arrange a pass-through so I can feed cords outside, and buy a generator off CL or something. Only had one long outage in five years here, but ten minutes after I said the hell with it on day four and checked into a motel, the power came back on.
--
aem sends...

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You hold the extension cord to see if your nuts get warm?

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You really should get a basic transfer switch, and hook it up to your panel. The generator is going to put out 2 legs of 120 volt @ 27 amps each. Using the one cord, you're only connecting to half the available power of the machine. If you have to use extension cords, you should have two cords going to the machine, one on each leg, assuming the generator has two separate outlets for this. Use the heaviest cords first, then split off the lighter cords nearer to the things being plugged in.
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wrote:

Consider buying or making up cords with Twistlock fittings. Besides being far less prone to coming apart when you most need them, they tend to be shunned by thieves because the fittings are different. All bets off if the bad guys are just salvaging copper, of course. Twistlocks are becoming pretty common on construction sites, and Bosch even sells a Twistlock version of the famous Skillsaw Mag 77.
Joe
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wrote:

For about 300$ Generac has a complete 6 circuit transfer kit, its pre wired, takes maybe 5 hrs to install, it has all plugs and exterior box and cables. If you run one apliance at a time going to a smaller cord should be ok but my transfer panel makes it easy and fun to use.
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