Proper Primer on Wood before Gloss Enamel

Painting some wooden signs that are going to have digital prints adherred to it. Sign shop told me to paint them with the "proper primer" and then a "gloss enamel" so that the digital prints will adhere properly for outdoor use. Any guidance as to what "proper primer" is, and are there different kinds of "gloss enamel" that would work better. Thanks for any help.
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On 3/5/2009 10:47 PM Albert spake thus:

Oil-based primer would be my choice, as well as oil-based enamel, rather than latex (water-based). You could use a water-based enamel if you prefer. Oil-based flows and adheres better.
You should, of course, get both the primer and enamel in exterior paint.
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Take a blank sign by a real paint store. Tell them what the printer said. They'll sell you everything you need, and they'll tell you exactly how to do each step.
Or you can call me, and I'll do it.
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Steve Bell
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They sell Ben Moore paint and California Paints at my local HW store, so I would get this primer:
http://tinyurl.com/d9hpek
and this paint:
http://www.californiapaints.com/ExteriorPaint.html#oil
Ken
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On Fri, 6 Mar 2009 09:36:39 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

seals. Be aware that in some states, while the OB primers are available, you can no longer get oil based exterior finish paints. If you can't in your area, an exterior latex gloss will also be fine. Actually, testing by Benjamin Moore has indicated that the latex exterior finishes will outperform the oil based. My own experience, unscientific though it may be, would seem to indicate this also. FWIW YMMV
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On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 22:47:38 -0800, Albert wrote:

Question:
Are you painting the wood, then attaching the graphic on top of the gloss enamel? and the graphic is exposed directly to outdoor weather?
Or
Are you priming the wood, attaching the graphic then coating the wood and graphic with a clear gloss acrylic enamel? Is the coating you are adding exposed to the outdoor weather?
BTW: If anyone asks me about Outdoors and Enamel, my first guess will always be Rust-O-Leum regardless of material being coated; primer and top coat paint. I just don't see anything being adhered (attached?) to the fully cured gloss enamel of rustoleum with out a good scratching with a 3M finishing pad. Even then, maybe, with a good quality contact cement adhesive.
Good luck.
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Phil Again wrote:

.......unless adhesive is used?
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On 3/6/2009 10:42 AM Phil Again spake thus:

I think the print he's trying to attach works something like a decal, which must be applied over a glossy surface (I know, seems kind of counter-intuitive, as usually we want to apply stuff over a flat surface that has more "tooth", but that's the way it works).
Presumably the adhered print could then be top-coated with a clear protective coating of some sort.
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wrote:

Use the primer as recommended by the finish coat (the enamel you are using). Using the same brand as the enamel paint would be a good choice.
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