Proper insulation for the Chicagoland area?

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I can understand the oversized furnace issue. What I don't understand is why my furnace will shut off and fire back up 10 mins later when I have my thermostat set to 69 degrees. I would think that the furnace should be able to stay off for longer then that. I've noticed that the thermostat never drops a single degree before it kicks the furnace back on again. Is there something internal on the thermostat that measures fractions of a degree?
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ATJaguarX wrote: ...

Well, the first reference concludes that their research to determine the effect of sizing on efficiency wasn't so successful -- see earlier quote. I also doubt unless it were _grossly_ wrong that the cycling off a few times per hour could be measured in reduced longevity vis a vis the more continual operation.

Possibly could be an excessively sensitive thermostat or perhaps there's a breeze blowing by it that it's sensing on the switching element or something similar. It may also have a sensitivity adjustment, particularly if it is digital, not analog.
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I've gone through the installation manual and there is an option to set the cycles per hour, but nothing about sensitivity.
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There must be a setting for degree setback . On my Lux it has 1- 10 , I have it set I think at 3 or 4 and it is not degrees, but it is not at this location so I dont know . Modern thermostasts have this option, read your non understandable, illogical, Chinese manual that came with it..Or just set setback up 1 number and experement.
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Another cold night of drafty windows. Winds were blowing from the south and the rooms on the south side of the house experienced a temp of 66 while the thermostat was at 69.
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thats about normal, for most homes...
can be elminated with a variable speed furnace where the bolwer always runs moving air around house helping to keep temperatures uniform.
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If you are lucky those were Energy Star rated windows and your complaint will be easily fixed because to get that rating they must be the best, but I dought any new modern windows today is designed that poorly so that you can actualy feel a leak, When my Pella leaked Pella came out for free and fixed it, it was only 2 months old. Did you find an air infiltration rating for them from the co that made them.
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They are SilverLine windows and I don't know what model they are. The builder is scheduling to have a SilverLine window guy come out and take a look.
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I just googled and found SilverLine windows are a division of Anderson which are tops, Contact Anderson also I think a rep will come out for free immediatly, Anderson did for me, Being a division of Anderson they should be well made
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After doing some digging on Silverline's website, I found the following:
"The ENERGY STAR program was developed by the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency to help consumers identify products that save energy and, therefore, keep your home more comfortable. All Silver Line windows and patio doors, when ordered with the appropriate glass, meet or exceed the ENERGY STAR guidelines in all 50 states."
- All Silver Line windows ... when ordered with the appropriate glass, meet or exceed the ENERGY STAR guidelines...". Now, were my windows ordered with the appropriate glass... thats the question...
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Your issue is not the glass, yet. To meet or exceed ES guidlines verified air infiltration tests should be good meaning you could have a defect. I dont think you should feel air comming in on an Energy Star window, get the test data from silverline and compare it to others.
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ransley wrote: ...

Which is what I said earlier -- I'm convinced the air infiltration is an installation problem, not the window itself.
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He said the air comes in the side tracks of the window that would not be an installation issue although with his uneven heating and an 80% furnace the builder cut corners.
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ransley wrote:

Depends -- I suspect that is behind the air seal of the window itself and is infiltration into the cavity. Would have to see the specifics of the window design to be absolutely sure, but seems unlikely it's an inherent design flaw.
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I'm sure that the windows are the bottom of the line SilverLines... I have yet to get an answer on what model/series they are.
After having the HVAC guy here for a few hours today and having him properly label all ducts, we adjusted the dampers and pretty much have all rooms within a degree or 2 of each other (theromostat currently at 69 and the "cold" room is at 68.2). I think the biggest issue was that I have a vent in my tv room about 10 feet away from the thermostat with a duct run of approx 12 feet. This was pumping out mega heat and was causing the thermostat to shut off much sooner and wasn't running enough to heat the other rooms.
I had mentioned to him that the one room (the only room we really close off) gets cold at night. This is my baby's room and we like to close the door until the kids go to bed (so they dont wake her). We notice that when we close the door, the room drops a few degrees (as much as 5). I think this has plenty to do with the windows and the air infiltration. Both the builder and the HVAC guy gave me the following reason. They said that when you close a room off like that, you're seperating it from the rest of the house. Since the room has 2 windows and 2 outside walls (and a ceiling), its going to get colder. I'm not sure if this is BS or not. It's not a large bedroom at 10x13 and this is the room that had heat coming out at 100+ degrees, so I don't know if i buy it. I know the master bedroom seems to get warmer if we keep the door closed (which we do), but we have a total of 5 vents in the master bedroom/bath/closet.
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So... the builder had this nifty tool that shot a lazer beam at a surface and read the surface temp. The temp outside was around 25 and the outside walls were between 63 and 65 degrees with the thermostat at 68. I was talking to a buddy and he told me that 63-65 was unacceptable. Too me, it seems reasonable... but he started accusing me of defending the builder... that the outside walls should be near the temp of the the room/thermostat. IMHO... you would need 2 feet of insulation for that.
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I posted pictures of my windows earlier in this thread. You'll see that the "insulation" on the side of the lower sash consist of just a thin piece of felt like material. I don't know how this is supposed to insulate.
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Id say the builder hired the cheapest hvac guy he could, to have a difference of f5 from the first to the second floor your first floor needs more supply, your furnace has a design in the temp rise, just closing vents without checking the temp rise just above the furnace will with enough vents closed raise the temp to above the heat exchangers limit for long life. And I bet he did not check its temp. Hire someone like an inspector to go over everything before your warranty runs out.
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The SilverLine 1200 windows are plain insulated glass, while the 9500 series have low-E glass. I am guessing that the 9500's (about 30% more expensive +/-) carry the energy star rating.
You can be mad at the builder, but if there aren't any regulations requiring the builder to use a window that meets a certain rating, then it is hard to expect them to use anything better than what is required.
I am doing a major addition on my house, and all my windows are Marvins, at an average cost of $450 / window. I could get Silverline 1200's in the same size for about $100 each. A builder isn't going to do this, since they are trying to make money on the house, where I am trying to make something that I will be proud to live in for the next 20 years.
JK
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Even a 100$ window should not have noticable air leaking in from the channel where the window slides up and down, Im sure there is a good air infiltration rating published for them at silverline, the question is whether they meet the rating and if the install is an issue, defects occur but can the HO figure it out. R or U value is mainly for glass in this case, and would not be a part of an air leakage rating . If he calls different manufacturers they will say he should not feel air comming in at 10-20mph winds, i did. He has to find ratings and do research to figure it out. I went through this and Pella replaced seals on several new windows for free.
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