Propane vs. Nat. Gas

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wrote:

I had an electromagnetic (?) range top once. All the cooking vessels had to be tested with magnets... or they would not heat. Cast iron worked and aluminum did not. Goood food.
-- Oren
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Oren wrote:

Induction. Seems to drift in and out of popularity.
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SteveB wrote:

No big difference in using it. There is very little difference between natural gas and propane as far as using it goes. Natural gas is cheaper than propane.
The deciding factor may be the initial cost. While the NG company may charge you a fee for hookup, the propane will be quite a hefty initial cost. The tank you will probably have to buy. The propane company will do the install and hook everything up to your gas line. Depending upon the size of your tank, that will be between 1200 and 1800 bucks including the first fill of propane.
With either one, you are going to have to install gas lines to your fixtures. I did my own and only had to pay for materials, so I can't tell you what it would be for you. I put the stove and the water heater on the propane. Left the AC/Heat as electric. Materials were about 150.00, not including stove and water heater.
I HATE electric stoves, so the choice was easy for me. YMMV
In addition, there are no inspections here in the country, so I did not have to deal with that. Again, YMMV.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 19:07:07 GMT, Robert Allison wrote:

I don't know about the initial hookup, but it costs me $60 a year to rent a 500 gallon propane tank. It was already here when I bought the trailer.
As far a grilling goes, I have been able to use the NG grill on much colder days than I could ever with propane. OTOH, the conversion from propane to NG is fairly inexpensive. I think it cost about $30 for the grill conversion kit (Great Outdoors grill, no longer being manufactured). For a stove it is simply replacing the jets.
Mike D.
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Mike Dobony wrote:

This is true and if you can get the propane company to rent you the tank, that is the way to go. For reasons that I don't like, they would only sell one to me. If I had put my HVAC on gas, they would have rented me a tank, but I didn't, so they wouldn't. Something about ALL the fixtures must be on propane for them to rent. That may be different in other areas.
When I first converted the stove, I just ran off a 60 gallon tank, which I carried down to the propane place to refill. When I installed the water heater, I didn't want to have to carry that down every 3 weeks or so, so I rented the tank. 250 gallon.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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I only have my stove on Propane (if you cook electric sucks - you cannot control the temp with any type of fine degree. Though if you bake electric ovens are the best). They wanted to start "renting" me the tanks for a couple hudred dollars a year because I didn't use "enough" propane - that on top of charging what amounts to twice the $ per gallon that any old place will fill a 20lb tank for. They call it a premium becuase I only use so much. That's when I told them to come get their tanks and I installed 2 40 lbers and a regulater bought at an RV store - got the idea when I saw all these RV's driving around with dual tanks and figured "Hell" that's all I need.. LOL! Now, not only do I pay less for propane I own the tanks. When I run out on the grill I can "rob" a tank from my house (or vice versa). The only "inconveniance" is a couple times a year I have to go 5 minutes down the road to buy propane.
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wrote:

Hi Steve,
I've cooked on electric, natural gas and, most recently, propane. I currently live in an area where natural gas won't be available for at least another ten years, so propane is what I use now. In my case, propane is almost twice as costly as electric per BTU, but it does allow me to prepare hot meals in the event of an extended power outage; that's important to me. And given a choice, I prefer natural gas or, alternatively, propane over electric for all the reasons you've no doubt heard before.
I had a natural gas BBQ when I lived in Toronto and it was great because you never worried about running out of propane (inevitably at the worst possible time) and messing with tanks or transporting the equivalent of a Ford Pinto in your trunk. My current BBQ is connected to the main propane tank by way of a quick disconnect, so these same benefits apply.
Just make sure the appliances you purchase can be easily converted to natural gas when that happy day comes (not a problem in most cases, but some BBQs cannot) and that the lines are properly sized for natural gas -- depending upon the BTU load, a larger diameter line may be required.
Cheers, Paul
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Its the same, its gas, Just get a stove that comes with or order now conversion jets, my cooktop came with both.
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SteveB wrote:

LP vs. Nat gas, effectively no difference, and cheap and easy to switch a stove between them.
As for waiting, if it's just the stove you want, by all means get it, set it for propane, and feed it from an ordinary purchased 100# LP tank. If you aren't running the furnace, hot water, gas dryer, etc. your LP use will be very low.
I have a dual fuel stove with 5 gas burners that runs from an ordinary 20# LP tank outside. I'm single, but I do like to cook so the stove gets plenty of use and I have to swap the 20# tank every 8+ months. Unless you have a huge family, it's highly unlikely you'd have to fill a 100# tank more than once a year, you can fill it anywhere, and you aren't paying rental on a huge LP tank you don't need.
If / when Nat. gas becomes available, you can hookup if you decide the economics and the monthly service charge warrant it. If you still only have a gas stove, and have no need to run anything else gas, I expect the economics will show that just filling the LP tank once a year and not paying any service charges is a better deal.
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Many if not all stoves are changeable without much effort, so you can buy propane now and go with NG later when it comes in and save, as NG is almost always cheaper.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Rick Blaine wrote:

Doubtful, since he would then have to purchase a new stove when NG became available.

If he's just running a stove, LP will absolutely be cheaper than NG since NG comes with a service charge every month, and for a stove only, all he'll have to do is take a 100# LP tank to be filled once a year at most and not pay any tank rental charges for a huge LP tank or service charges for NG service.

Fill a portable tank every few weeks???????? What planet are you on? Or are you cooking for an entire town from a 20# LP tank? A 20# LP tank runs my stove and I swap it out every 8-10 months.
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- Electric appliances are generally cheaper than gas ones - Some of the cost of said electric appliance could be recovered by selling it, if & when get gets NG - The cost of hooking (connection to the street) up to the NG service is not going to be cheap - Paying a NG billing charge every month, especially if the only thing hooked up is a range is going to cost a packet - There's no guarantee NG will become available
Economically, he's better off staying with an electric range. Personal preference for cooking with gas trumps this, of course.
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Rick Blaine wrote:

Somewhat, but once you get above the basic models the difference disappears quickly.

Almost never happens, at least in the US. People throw out perfectly good appliances during a remodel... not that that's a good thing :(

Nope, it will be free, the usual tactic of the gas utility to lock people into their monthly service charges. When they run lines into a neighborhood, they have crews there anyway and they want to get as many hookups as possible to start paying for that line construction.

Exactly. If he had gas heat, hot water, clothes dryer, shop heat, etc. it would generally be worthwhile. I don't think he's in a big heating area though.

Correct.
If he likes to cook on gas, a 100# owned LP tank (or even a 40# probably) would do just fine and be economical.
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I've run a gas grill of a 20# tank, grill 3 or 4 times a week and needed to fill every 3-4 weeks. I suppose if all you used were the burners, it would last longer.
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Rick Blaine wrote:

A 20# LP tank runs my 5 burner dual fuel range for 8-10 months. I'm single, but I enjoy cooking and cook a lot, often with multiple burners active. A 100# tank would surely last the OP a year, a 40# at least 6 months.
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i have picked up neighbors tanks they buy a new grill and put the old grill at the curb. i piler the tanks, some were full. most had old style valves so i take the tank to home depot and exchange the empty for a full one with current valve, then refill it which is cheaper when its empty again.
i have 6 or 7 tanks in my shed, we grill a lot, i never run out.
about once a year i get them all filled............
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the new stoves come setup for nat, and have the LP orifices included.
s

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SteveB wrote:

works just as good.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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wrote:

Steve, visit a local RV/mobile home business.. They can give you ideas. many places as a child had duel propane tanks. LP tanks usage was rotated when a tank was empty...turn one valve on and the other off. The local company filled the empty tank, so you always had one tank full of LP.
Before that is was splitting wood to cook (another stove)..
NG is the best for my cooking, BUT you may pay dearly to get it into the house. Let the gas company bring the lines to you. Over time it cost you less.
-- Oren
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Oren wrote:

No appreciable difference between NG and LP for cooking.

Not if they are just bringing the lines into the neighborhood when they're desperate to get people hooked up and paying monthly service charges.

At no charge.

Not if all you run on gas is the stove. LP with an owned tank or two will be much cheaper than paying a service charge to a gas company every month. $20-$40 per year of LP will be a lot cheaper than paying like $8 per month just to have gas available, plus the cost of the gas you actually use.
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