Propane Tank Location?

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What are the rules about propane tank location (distance from the house, etc). Are these national rules or do they vary with individual states?
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It all varies. We bought a cabin. One insurance company said the propane tank cannot be within 50' of the structure. Others said nothing. It might be a building department regulation. An insurance company requirement.
Check your local regs. It don't matter what they do in Kansas.
Steve
(hope you are not in Kansas ...............)
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Depends on the tank size also. I have two large (100 pound?) cylinders right next to my house but they are not allowed to be within 3' of a door or window. Larger tanks must be away from the house, but I don't know the size or the distance. and it may vary by location.
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On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 00:57:45 +0000, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Iirc, the 3' thing has to do with fueling the tank; same holds for the outside fueling point for an oil tank in the basement. As for propane tanks, some places there is a regulation that prohibits "hiding" it with a fence, shrubs, etc.
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Next door neighbor (previous owner) had propane stove and had the tanks (tall slender type) right next to the house. Newer neighbors across the street - propane company put their large tank about 40 feet from their mobile home. My tank was there when I bought the place - large type - about 20 feet from the house.
Must vary by state - or possibly even within the state - by location. Check with the pros - if you have anything other than the small tanks you bring in yourself - they will probably have to install it anyway.
Jan
Learn something new every day As long as you are learning, you are living When you stop learning, you start dying
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There are plenty of national and regional propane trade organizations and companies web sites that spell out a lot of information. Best to rely on a pro rather than a bunch of newsgroup addicts on that. Your local dealer will know the regs.
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On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 23:00:28 +0000 (UTC), Jonathan Grobe

Hey you need to heed EP's and other's advice and get the local pro's to tell you. In addition to distance, some codes restrict orientation that is the direction of the center axis. Something about if a head were to blow off.
Frank
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it's local codes. ask the guy who's going to install it. in my area, my 500 gal tank is about 30' from the garage wall buried about 6' down so that only the cap is above ground.
regards, charlie cave creek, az http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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: What are the rules about propane tank location : (distance from the house, etc). Are these national : rules or do they vary with individual states?
: -- : Jonathan Grobe Books : Browse our inventory of thousands of used books at: : http://www.grobebooks.com
Orientation is probably the most critical - you can't place it such that the ends of the tank are aimed at your house. If it explodes, the ends shoot out so you want to make sure they are pointing somewhere else...
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wrote:

Ayup. I've seen video of a propane tank doing the BLEVE (boiling liquid, expanding vapor explosion) trick, and it's impressive... and something to avoid being near...
Dave Hinz
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We got lucky and avoided at least *THAT* particular problem when the house burned down a couple years ago. Fire guys were *REAL* interested in knowing where the (recently topped off in preparation for the oncoming winter) 300+ gallon propane tank was when they first got here, and once located, kept a hose on it for the duration. Stuff further from the house than the tank was bursting into flames with no visible source of ignition just because of the radiant heat from the fire - most of the fire-crew effort went to keeping the surrounding vegetation and such from catching - The house was already a total write-off 20 minutes or more before they actually managed to arrive. (Absolutely no intent to slam the FD for poor response time should be imagined - I have a very firm grasp on the reality that it's a 30 minute drive from here to the nearest fire station when I "leadfoot" it in my little semi-sports car - "Only" 45 minutes from the call to 911 to seeing a "ready-for-action" firetruck pull onto the property is doing *EXTREMELY* well indeed.)
The two portable propane tanks hooked up under the grill that was sitting on the deck vented with a roar like a pissed off dragon, backed with what I'd estimate to be a 30+ foot long tounge of flame, but fortunately they didn't BLEVE, or I imagine we'd have lost the other two vehicles and probably a couple of the horses along with everything else that burned in the house.
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Yep. There's a vent on the top (round pipe looking thing a few inches high) that is _supposed to_ open when the tank pressure is high. We had a fire where that was venting, and near the fire, of course it was a hella-big torch. That was fine, really, we didn't mind. Kept a hose on the tank, so the surface stayed wet (below boiling point of water on the outside = not too hot on the inside). We weren't nervous until the venting stopped, because there's no way to know if it was just empty (it was), or if the vent had melted shut or something. There was some pucker-factor at that one.

Been there, done that. Don't like it. One of our house fires started in an unattended house on a day with 40 MPH winds. Can you say "blowtorch"? The only thing we could do, as you say, was protect the exposures.

Whic means 45 minutes by tanker, or more. Those things drive like, well, like things that are really big, slow, and filled with water.

Long time when you're on the calling end of the phone, though.

Saved the horses? Fantastic. That was another fire recently, at a horse barn. The kind of place where people board their horses, maybe 40 or 50 of 'em. Not a good ride to that fire, let me tell you. But, they all got out. Barn was a total loss, and housing was a bit tight in the county for a bit, but there ya go.
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wrote:

why don't more places allow burying the tanks? it shouldn't get very hot in that case, and who wants to look at a propane tank anyway?
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 15:19:07 -0700, Charles Spitzer

Well, how would you know when it's rusted/leaking then?
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wrote:

wouldn't you smell it?
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Many jurisdictions allow buired tanks. They have a special coating to reduce corrosion and have anodes on the to corode first. Over 50% of all new tank installations in the US are now buired. See the web sites for tank manufacturers such as American Tank or Trinity.
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 15:24:41 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

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On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 15:24:41 -0700, Charles Spitzer

Maybe, but direct soil contact will rust a tank a lot faster than just being out in the atmosphere. And, braindead lawmakers being what they are, probably can't differentiate between this fuel and other fuel tanks.
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wrote:

as others have said, they coat them. i buried mine, and was just wondering why they didn't do this a lot more. i expect the empty tank costs more, but i didn't compare prices when i ordered mine. it certainly was more expensive for permits and time consuming to get the fire dept to come out to inspect and map it for their records.
all you can see is the metal cap over the valves, which are below ground level. i saved in that i didn't have to build a wall around it to hide it, so the cost was pretty much a wash i'd expect.
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Tanks designed for burial are coated with a very thick, probably half inch, coating of asphalt. Such coated tanks do not rust. Burying propane tanks has been around at least since I was a kid, for I recall seeing them. I imagine they have this coating thing pretty well figured out by now.
FWIW, they recently dug up some est 80 year old asphalted gas tanks from an abandoned gas station across the street. The tanks were in perfect condition and still contained some probably 30 year old gasoline. No rust inside or out. It seemed such a shame to cut them up and haul them away.
John
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Oh, I agree, but that's not direct soil contact then. You wouldn't want to bury a stanard propane tank, though.

Asphalt goes back a few thousand years, so probably, yup.

And yet, no doubt, by some law it was required, am I right? I mean, why actually test for real problems when you can just pass sweeping generalizations and all that?
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