Propane Heater Suggestions

I've googled around for propane heaters but thought that maybe someone in t his group might have a suggestion as to a specific make and model to fit my needs. I built a greenhouse for my wife a few years back. It's 10' X 14' a nd averages about 8' high, average because of the sloping roof. We've been heating it through the Baltimore winters with a 19,000 maximum BTU 240 volt electric heater. We had an abnormally cold winter this year, resulting in a couple of $500 electric bills. The advantage to a propane heater is that it would keep running during power outages, eliminating the need to carry t he kerosene heater out there from the garage in the middle of a blizzard.
The house is heated with oil and we don't have natural gas lines available, so I thought of getting a propane heater and a couple of propane tanks. Wh en the first tank empties, I'd switch to the second one and take the empty tank up for refilling.
I'd have to work out some ventilation for the new heater, of course. If I c ould get a heater designed to attach to an exhaust pipe that would help.
Most greenhouse supply sites are aimed at commercial growers and feature he aters on a grand scale. I just need a little unit to replace the current 19 ,000 BTU electric heater.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Paul
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On 3/13/2015 8:58 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

a specific make and model to fit my needs. I built a green house for my wife a few years back. It's 10' X 14' and averages about 8' high, average because of the sloping roof. We've been heating it through the Baltimore winters with a 19,000 maximum BTU 240 volt electric heater. We had an abnormally cold winter this year, resulting in a couple of $500 electric bills. The advantage to a propane heater is that it would keep running during power outages, eliminating the need to carry the kerosene heater out there from the garage in the middle of a blizzard.

a couple of propane tanks. When the first tank empties, I'd switch to the second one and take the empty tank up for refilling.

exhaust pipe that would help.

a little unit to replace the current 19,000 BTU electric heater.

and seen some in action. I think you're going in the right direction, got to be cheaper than electric. I'd check your hardware stores near you, if you want to DIY install. Or call heating and AC companies for quotes.
Heaters can be either wall mount (with exhaust pipe) and some are made which screw right onto the propane tank.
As to wall mount, most of them dump the exhaust outdoors. Some come with electric fan to help move air.
Buddy heater is an example of tank mount. You would have to take the 20 pound tanks to some where to exchange or refill them.
For your greehouse, I suspect a wall heater might work. With a couple tanks outdoors. Have the propane company come out and fill the tanks from a truck.
If the greenhouse isn't all that far from the house, you might be able to run some ducts from your home furnace, and use the oil furnace in the house to keep the greenhouse going.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 9:22:27 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The greenhouse is attached to the south wall of the house. We have a hot water boiler system; running the pipes to a radiator out there would be a major job. Thanks for the advice, a through-the-wall sounds like what I need.
Paul
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On 3/13/2015 11:51 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

the pipes to a radiator out there would be a major job. Thanks for the advice, a through-the-wall sounds like what I need.

Worth a look, some how. The home heating oil might be less expensive than installing a whole new propane system. And seriously cheaper than that electric heater.
Another poster mentioned that carbon dioxide and water vapor are used by plants. Yes, we learned that in government schools. Could be helpful.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Pavel314 wrote:

Not sure why you'd want to vent it , CO2 and water vapor are both a Good Thing for the plants ... but then you'd want to check CO levels before you went inside . Just a thought .
--
Snag



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On 3/13/2015 8:42 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

with the sliding patio door giving access to it. I used a catalytic Propane heater in it during the winter. Worked well. The greenhouse was not very well sealed, so CO was not much of an issue.
Paul
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wrote:

If you want to use this for more than an occasional power outage, for example to save on the electric bill, forget using 20lb refillable propane tanks. A refilled tank at alot of gas stations and stores cost about $20 (with your empty tank). That's $20 for about 3 gallons of propane. Get a large tank outdoors and you'll pay about $1.50 to $2.50 per gallon. (Rather than $6.50 to $7.00 per gallon using those 20LB tanks).
But if you only want something for those occasional power outages, they use the 20LB tanks and buy one or two of those "Mr. Heater" (look like sunflowers) heaters made for camping, etc. They heaters are around $50, or $70 for a double headed one. But you'll only get one days worth of heat out of a 20LB tank. (or less). And they are not vented, and consume oxygen, so be safe when you use them.
A larger (smallish propane furnace), which is vented would be better, but many of them need electricity, which is not gonna work during a power outage. But they make 12V models for RV campers that can run on both 120V AC or a 12V car battery. But you will want at least one spare CHARGED battery. Those are also vented and safe as far as air pollution, CO2, etc.
Propane heating is cheaper than electric heat, but NOT if you use those 20LB tanks. With those small tanks, it's probably MORE expensive than electricity.
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