Propane grill hose repair question.

I have a Sunbeam outdoor propane grill that I need to replace the hose on, because it got cut and leaks.
The problem is that the valves and regulator both have the hose clamped onto them with a brass clamp, not a screw on connection that is widely available.
I am having a very hard time finding someone who even carries LPG hose by the foot let alone the capability to clamp it onto the valves and regulator.
Any ideas on where I could go to have a new hose put on? I live in San Marcos, CA near San Diego. I've been to Barbeques Galore, a hydraulics shop, a propane company, all with no luck.
Or ideas on where I can buy a crimper, clamps, fittings and hose to do it my self?
Thanks,
Wes
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Wes Schott wrote:

I's =strongly= suggest you contact the manufaturer of the Grill , they'll surely have repair parts .
The hose 'fittings', and tube, require a special press_fit tool , not widely available to 'John' Q Public.
E
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Propane suppliers SOMETIMES do hoses.
Steve
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they don't like to because then they absorb the liability.
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On Wed, 18 May 2005 22:43:45 -0700, "Wes Schott"

http://www.grillstuff.com/sungrilpar.html
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Wes Schott wrote:

Your cheapest solution is probably to just replace the hose/regulator as a unit. Usually a $15-22 item.
People on this ng will scream but if all you have is a cut, then cut all the way through the hose, look for brass fittings to attach to hoses together (essentially a tube with ridges that is slightly larger than the inside diameter of the hose) at Lowes or a hardware store, and secure with small screw clamps.
Realize that the pressure within the hose will be less that what you produce by blowing in a tube.
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I have done it so I could use old style tanks with a new grill (having found about 4 full discarded tanks and another 4 for a buck or two at garage sales) but wouldn't dare be the first to admit it.
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Toller, you don't value your life much do you?
Discarded tanks may not pass a hydro test. Refrigerant recovery tanks must get hydrostatically tested every 5 years to be legal. If those discarded tanks won't pass the test they are not safe to use. You might get away with it, but why take the chance? I am not talking about the law either. I know an A/C contractor who had a tech leave a refrigerant tank on a roof under a unit so he wouldn't have to lug it up & down every time he serviced that building. The tank blew, landed on a car two blocks away. Hefty fine, also had to pay damages, his company name was on the tank. Lucky no one got hurt or killed! Propane, like refrigerant, is stored in tank as part gas, part liquid. If the tank ruptures for any reason, you have a missle and a bomb. Not worth the chance to me. "Some days you gets the bear, some days the bear gets you." If you understood the physics involved, or even saw the results of a failure just once, you would not do it or tell any one else how to.
Not trying to be an ass, just concerned.
Stretch
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He said they were discarded, not past date for testing.
New tanks have OPD valves and some places will no longer fill them. Some states have adopted the new regs, some have not. I still use my old tanks and will as long as legal to do so. IIRC., propane tanks are 10 or 12 years.
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Publication NFPA 58 covers the requirements for propane storage and transport equipment. Any gas handling facility should have one in their possession. The NFPA list of books cover a lot of controlled subjects, and are what Authorities Having Juristiction (AHJ) refer to as their enforcement criteria. In North Carolina, LP is regulated by the Dept of Agriculture, Standards division, just for reference. As part of my job, I monitor, maintain, and control operations of an 18,000 gallon bulk isobutane storage facility that fills small disposable cyinders. You would not believe the rules and laws controlling the facility.
RJ

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be stable while I empty them.
Since they can't be refilled, I just don't see the danger. Thanks for your concern though.
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Check with appliance repair places. The hose and regulator are probably sold as an assembly. One of my parts houses used to have gas grill parts.
I doubt you'll be able to recrimp (or replace and clamp) it. It's only about 11 PSI, if memory serves. But, the liability of messing it up, that's the concern.
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On Sat, 21 May 2005 01:53:40 GMT, Stormin Mormon

Yup. But about 11" "water column" is probably closer. Between the tank and the regulator is a lot more...
sdb
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