Propane generator for blackouts?

Page 1 of 5  
I'm considering getting a generator for backup in case of power blackouts and propane seems like a good idea since I always have a tank or two for the grill. It seems easier to maintain than gasoline.
It just needs to run a standard refrigerator and /or TV, maybe a 120v A/C if it's summer. I'm looking at this one which got pretty decent reviews for the $430 price: (Amazon.com product link shortened)85981320&sr=1-3
If that link doesn't work just look at Amazon for propane generator.
Any comments greatly appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can also get Tri fuel generators, Ng, Propane, gasolene. Having a generator hooked up to the Ng house supply you wont ever need to go out to buy fuel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's excellent idea, if the OP has natural gas at the house. And if the NG is dependable. Where I am (New York State) the natural gas has been more dependable than the electic, by far.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dgk wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)85981320&sr=1-3
I wonder how long it will run on the size of tank you have. You might spend a lot of time getting fuel. There are many for sale on Ebay also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 7:22 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

My gasoline powered generator has nearly twice the power outlet and if run 24 hours would take 10 gal of gas so I would imagine this one would consume about 5 gal of propane in a day's use.
Unit should be easier to maintain than gasoline since you need not worry about stagnant fuel in tank or carburetor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank wrote:

Stagnant fuel is not really a concern: 1. Gasoline should stay usable for at least a year, 2. The addition of a fuel stabilizer increases that time significantly, 3. Run the thing using aviation or marine fuel, or 4. Don't put any gas in the tank until ready for use and remove all the fuel from the machine after the emergency is over.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

I keep mine full, about 5 gallons. I change out the gas once a year and use it in my tractors and lawn mowers. Put in fresh gas and run it to replenish the carb with fresh gas. That way I'm ready to generate. Power outages are usually unexpected.
--
LSMFT

I look outside this morning and everything was in 3D!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A generator needs to be run periodically to be reliable. I run mine once a month for 15 minutes under a load. I fill the gas tank once a year with gas that has Stable in it. During a power outage, I only run it as needed for the refrigerator and water pump. I have a battery system for lights which gets charged every Sunday.
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 9:27 AM, ---MIKE--- wrote:

I skipped the details but I also keep mine filled with stabilized gas and run every few months. Power outages never happen at opportune times and I don't want to mess with pouring gas and a cranky machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat 02 Oct 2010 04:50:50a, Frank told us...

True, very low maintenance. At one time my grandparents lived in an area with no electricity. They had a whole house propane generator, but they had a huge propane tank burned in the yard. I don't know the rate of consumption.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Assuming you can get fuel during a big outage. Propane bulk tanks use an electric pump to transfer. I like the idea of propane over gas though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 7:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But, gasoline pumps need electricity, also. During a really long outage, I wonder how that would affect natural gas "delivery"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 8:24 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

The natural gas distribution system uses natural gas powered turbines to pressurize the lines so it would keep on humming.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 8:25 AM, George wrote:

LMAO!! better do some more homework.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 10:28 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

Where would you suggest I start with the homework? One of my oldest friends works for the one of the major natural gas pipeline companies and I posed the question about what happens when the electric power fails a long time ago and he said they are self sufficient as I described. I have seem the interior of pumping stations and it is very clever how they set them up.
Our local gas utility also has a number of stations. The largest one in my area is near a pipeline river crossing in a wooded area where the local system connects to the intrastate pipeline. There isn't electric service within a half mile of there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 9:52 AM, George wrote:

All's i'm saying is that they are not ALL that way. Some are electric, some are NG turbine, and some are NG fueled internal combustion engines. But in the case of a wide spread electrical failure, you can bet the NG would go down also. The control centers are not NG powered. I'd go with propane if i had a backup generator. Just just my preference.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 10:57 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

I've seen natural gas "substations" that have solar panels to keep things going when power fails, however, as one person mentioned, it's not the same everywhere.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When the Ohio & New York grid went down for a couple of days a few years ago my NG was not interrupted.
MikeB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 9:57 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

You don't think something as mission critical as a control center for a utility is going to have backup power? Hell son, nuclear plants have diesel generators to run operations when the reactor/s are shut down. GEEZ!
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2010 10:25 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

ya, i wonder how many days worth of stale diesel fuel these NG control centers have on hand?
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.