Propane Gas Heat

We are looking at a new development where the homes are heated with Propane Gas. Houses are about 2100sq feet. Any problems with this kind of heating.
Thank you.
Jim
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James Repetski wrote:

There are two factors I can think of that you should be aware of.
1. Propane is heavier than air. Unlike natural gas that is lighter and tends to dissipate quickly; propane tends to pool in the basement and can be more dangerous. You want to be sure to have a detector in use and be extra careful. I don't want to say it is un-safe, but the differences can make it less safe if you are not aware of them.
2. Price! Compare price on a per thermal bases to figure out any cost of operation issues.
--
Joseph Meehan

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James Repetski wrote:

$$$$ (You better have lots of them...).
Of course, depending on where you are, natural gas may not be <that> much cheaper, but better check carefully on what local relative costs are and relative usages as that may give some clues as to looking forward.
I wouldn't turn the house down on that basis alone, but I'd not select it as my first choice in most locations. While it's common here in gas-producing country where there isn't NG distribution and we used it for tractor fuel in the 60s-80s, I just don't like having the tank as part of a residential setting unless it's the only practical choice.
Of course, if we didn't have a major pipeline running through the pasture close enough to the house to have a tap, we'd be on LP, too... :)
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No problems with it, except if you have a 90%+ furnace, don't let the tank run out. Propane at low pressure can sot up a furnace pretty bad. It can completely plug up a secondary heat exchanger.
Price wise it varies with what is popular and available. In our area usage prices seem to run electric, oil, propane the natural gas as far as cost. In some areas you can get pretty cheap electric rates for heat so sometimes electric is the way to go. Greg
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 16:57:30 GMT, "James Repetski"

Expensive!
I'd have a heat pump as primary and propane as secondary backup.
I'm assuming that natural gas is not available.
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JimL wrote:

The efficiency of that choice will depend heavily on the location and type/quality of the heat pump. If OP's in a really fridgid location, an air-exchange heat pump may well run on the backup heat most of the time. A ground exchange system might solve that but would be more expensive initially...
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