Programmable Thermostat

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The temperature in my home is always either too hot or too cold so I suspect the programmable thermostat is not set correctly.
The owner's manual mentions "set point" but it's not clear what that means.
Is the "setpoint" the temperature at which the furnace (or air conditioner) turns on or turns off?
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The set point is the temperature you want the room to be, i.e. when the system turns off.
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Doug Miller wrote:

And there will be some hysteresis built in - ie the "on" and "off" temperatures will be a couple or so degrees apart to prevent rapid firing.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

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The set point is the number on the thermostat you see. It is the number that you put the dial on or if digital , the number you adjust up and down.
If programmable, you probably have several Set Points. That is the temperature you want the house to be at the time you want.
Say you leave the house at 8:00 every day, you may want to have the setpoint at 65 deg. If you come home at 5:00 then about 4 or 4:40 you want to move the set point back to 70 deg so the house will be at 70 deg when you get home. Then about 10 at night you may want to have the set point at 68 deg for sleep. Then about 5 in the morning you may want to have the set point at 70 so the house will be warm when you get up.
You will have to adjust the set point to match the temperature you are comfortabel at. Give the house an hour or two for each degree you move the set point while trying to find a confortable temperature while you are in the house.
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wrote:

Didn't you post this exact same post a couple of months ago ?????
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For my thermostat, there's a "COOL" and a "HEAT" mode for "MORNING", "DAY", "EVENING" and "NIGHT".
In the middle of winter, I don't want "COOL".
How do I programming it for "HEAT" only?
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wrote:

TROLL alert !!!!
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I'll repeat my earlier question:
On my thermostat, there's a "COOL" and a "HEAT" mode for "MORNING", "DAY", "EVENING" and "NIGHT". In the middle of winter, I don't want "COOL". How do I programming it for "HEAT" only?
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On 12/28/2012 3:00 PM, . wrote:

"EVENING" and "NIGHT". In the middle of winter, I don't want "COOL". How do I programming it for "HEAT" only?

Paul
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Didn't the thermostat come with an instruction book, or if not, did you contact the manufacturer?????
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wrote:

Push the switch to the "heat" position
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"Set the 'cool' temp to something like 85 degrees)". "Push the switch to the "heat" position"
Which one should I do or should I do both?
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. formulated the question :

Since you are too stupid to have a name how could we expect you to R T F M.
Please try and understand your own problem before asking stupid questions.
If you do not know, RTFM means READ THE Fantastic (F******) Manual :-Z
--
John G



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On 12/29/2012 2:27 AM, John G wrote:

WTF!, Wow That's Fantastic! ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

John, this person asked the same thing about 3 or 4 months ago here. I remember his first question was exactly the same question as before. Even if I took it seriously, I can't believe a person wouldn't give the make or model of the thermostat to help others return the help. Oh well, I guess he needs attention and this is how he gets some. I hope he learns how to use his thermostat or he might have one cold residence <grin>.
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Dot has to be a troll, no one could grow up being that stupid.
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[ 22 ]:
Unfortunately, with the decision to purchase a programmable thermostat comes the obligation to learn how to program that new thermostat. It's like buying a clock radio and going online to find someone to help you figure out how to set the alarm time on it.
Every digital thermostat is different, and you need to find a 1-800 number in the literature that came with it to determine how to program it correctly.
Also every thermostat, whether digital or analog will have an "heat anticipator" setting that needs to be set. A heat anticipator in an analog thermostat is nothing more than a small electric heater that fools the thermostat into thinking the room is warmer than it really is. The reason for having a heat anticipator is that some forms of heating have a long residual heat time. For example, cast iron baseboard radiators will continue to convect heat into the room long after the boiler shuts down. The purpose of the heat anticipator is to heat the be-metallic coil inside the thermostat to fool it into thinking the room is warmer than it really is. That shuts off the boiler early so that the temperature doesn't overshoot the set point be as much as it otherwise would.
Another reason for having a heat anticipator in a thermostat is that the thermostat is typically centrally located in the house or zone being heated, whereas the radiators or heating ducts are located around the perimeter of the house or zone being heated. If the boiler were to continue firing until the temperature at the thermostat was at the set point, the room temperature between the thermostat and the perimeter of the house or zone being heated would be well above the set point. Consequently, the heat anticipator is set to shut the heating system off early so that the average temperature in the house or zone being heated fluctuates about the set point.
Now, your literature will tell you to add up all the amperage draws on all of the thermostats zone valves and everything on the 24 volt AC loop the thermostat is on to determine the heat anticipator setting. As of now, I have yet to find anyone who can explain why the heat anticipator setting should be equal to the current draw of the thermoatat 24 VAC loop. You're best bet is to simply set the heat anticipator setting lower if you find that your furnace is cycling too frequently, and to set your heat anticipator setting higher if you find too long a time between your furnace cycling on and shutting off.
--
nestork

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On 12/28/2012 11:13 AM, . wrote:

I would expect it to be half way between the two temperatures. For example, set it to 70 and the heat comes on at 68 and goes off at 72.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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[When I ask for help, I expect the responses to be helpful (not insulting)].
I have a Totaline Model P474-1035 Programmable 5-2 day Digital Thermostat.
In the owner's manual, in the "Normal Operation" section, the "Manual Thermostat Operation" instructions say to:
1. Set the program switch to "OFF".
2. Set the mode switch to "Heat" or "Cool". (Since I don't need cooling in the winter, I've set the mode switch to "Heat").
3. Set the fan switch to "On" or "Auto". (Since I don't want the fan to run all the time, I've set the fan switch to "Auto").
4. Use the "Up" or "Down" buttons to set the desired temperature. (I've set the desired temperature to 78 degrees)
If the current room temperature is 64 degrees, shouldn't the heat come on immediately or is there a built-in delay?
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. wrote:

That seems a lot more clear as to what your question is etc.
Since you have the thermostat set up to operate manually, the heat should come on if the room temperature is 64 and you set the desired temperature to 78. There could be some delay in the heater coming on depending on what type of heater you have etc., but the delay shouldn't be too long -- I'm guessing a few minutes at the most.
If the heater isn't coming on, something else is wrong. Does your heater have a little red indicator light on it that is either staying on constantly or is blinking? If it is blinking, watch to see what the blinking sequence is -- such as 3 blinks, etc. Then read the instructions on the front of the heater that says what the different blinking sequences mean.
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