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The guy I worked for, had a Panasonic cordless drill with a LED in front that turns on when you drill. That was incredibly useful, working on furnace in dark cellars.
Bubble level? I could have used one of those on a job was on, in 1985, installing deadbolts on an apartment complex.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Eh, possibly, but once you get "the eye" you don't need a level anymore. e.g. I've drilled out cheap soft 5/16" bolts with their heads twisted off right to the threads, tapped the holes to bust out the swarf, and reused the holes without helicoils or anything. Way I look at it is, if I teach myself the skills, I can use anyone's tools to do the job right (so long as the bearings aren't all worn out and wobbly) - if I rely on a level then a) I can only do that job with my own tool and b) if the level ever gets knocked or misadjusted then I'm screwed.
I find sighting down the top of the drill like a pistol is probably the most accurate way to drill a straight hole, short of using a drill press. For this reason I like drills with nice flat tops and a seam on the case dead center.
nate
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HeyBub wrote:

I'm assuming that that was tongue in cheek. I don't care if my drill weighs 10 lbs. if I need to drill a hole in a truck frame, and only have to do that every couple years or so. I can (and do) keep a cheap consumer grade model around for around-the-house tasks.
nate
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I know of what you speak. I'm still working Black & Decker commercial (my age is showing now), Porter Cable for wood working tools, and Milwaukee for anything that counts. I have never liked Bosch. I have two old Makita drywall guns before they changed the style (for the worse). I got started with DeWalt cordless and have stayed there due to batteries, etc. Ridgid makes the only plumbing tools.
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Oops!!!!! I'm not a professional. Not in home repair anyways...
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I think the quality of products like power tools, is, and has always been cyclic. Every one of the manufacturers mentioned has at one time or another produced good stuff. I don't care where it's made or who makes it, if there is a market for a quality tool, one will be produced by somebody. I would guess at this point in time, with world wide competition, and a lower quality market catering to do-it-yourselfers, there just isn't a great market for expensive professional grade tools, but eventually someone will see the need and produce them again... for a time. Currently I use: Dewalt, Milwaukee, Bosch, Makita,Skil,and Kango.... They're all crap, but their relatively cheap

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evodawg wrote:

Some of the best and highest quality power tools I've ever used are manufactured by Hilti (Liechtenstein) and Metabo (Germany). Their tools are very tough and powerful. If you ever come across any in a pawn shop, snatch them up if the price is reasonable.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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Uncle Monster wrote:

I agree those are 2 quality tool manufactures
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evodawg wrote:

I know a lot of fitters are using Hilti now, but I also see that they are being sold at HD in a special display, does that mean that one should stock up on tools now before Hilti quality drops like everyone else's?
They do seem to have at least one market cornered, e.g. "Hilti gun" now seems to be common usage for a powder-actuated nailer (hey, I missed that in the thread re: Crescent wrench, Vise-grip, Kleins, etc.)
nate
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What qualifications do I need, in order to have your permission to reply?
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You just have to be a professional. Did not specify at what. Me, I am professional pain-in-the-ass so I am cleared to join the thread (grin).
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But I wanna be a prffeesshhhoneal, too... Mommy, make him stop!
Professional whiner, here.
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So, only professionals can reply. Us no-pro, but serious tool uses don't count? If not for us, the pro would have even less choices. We buy the PC, Bosch, Festool and the like that makes for enough volume to support the pro line manufacturing.
Get your head out of your ass and consider the serious tool user, not just the pro.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Hey I consider the serious tool user a pro. I didn't want to hear from the B&D crowd!
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wrote:

yeah no kidding! Amateurs can't fathom how hard it is to become a professional!
Oh yeah, that's right, it isn't hard. Just get a license, slap a name on the side of a beat up pickup and call yourself a "professional".
*snort*
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Martha, we are just GOING to have to move. There are B and D users in this neighborhood.
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I think it's because you, "no-pro" but serious tool users make up the largest group of tool buyers, that there are currently no truly professional grade tools being made. The manufacturers are simply catering to the largest demand, also, the current crop of tools aren't horrible, so the professional user just replaces them more often

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So its my fault.
I buy the best tools available. As a society of consumers, we too often want cheap; not to mention the throw away mentality. Harbor Freight would not exist if they depended on me as I've never been inside of one, nor do I intend to. It is not just tools, it is the $7 toasters and $10 shoes. It is the weekend warrior that wants to look cool but does not want to pay much.
If the pro was willing to pay more, we'd have better quality tools. Manufacturers are interested in profit first. If they can get by with something that functions well for 5 to 10 years, that is certainly better for them than to build something that will last 20 years and cost 25% more. Face it, it is better for them to have you buy a new drill, router, whatever in five years than for them to inventory replacement parts for 15 years.
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wrote:

No, not your fault. I trusted a worker with a paint brush for thirty minutes. It was distroyed. He never got my good tools.
Pros will know if the worker can repsect the tool, just that --- a tool.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

There is a time and place for Harbor Freight. e.g. I bought a grinder pedestal there for $30. It's cheap, yes, but ordering one for $100 or more online and then paying the freight to have it delivered would be prohibitive. It works. The pipe used for the actual pedestal is a little cheap, and the bolts are very low grade, but if it ever becomes an issue I can certainly pick up some schedule 40 (maybe even from the scrap pile at work) and some 8.8 bolts for far less than the difference in price between HF and the "good stuff."
I agree in principle though; I'll buy grinder pedestals, pickle forks, etc. at HF but I'm not inclined to buy anything electrical or requiring significant amount of stress there. (a friend picked up some pry bars because they were so cheap; they bend easier than a Craftsman screwdriver.)
I did buy a clear water pump there because it was something like $20 but I haven't gotten off my ass yet to try it.
One thing I don't understand is why mfgrs. seem to think users are impressed by gimmicks... I just used a circular saw that I'd received as a gift; typical Craftsman 7-1/4" thing. It has a couple neat features; I like the way the shoe adjusts and it has little LED lights to help you see the workpiece. But it has a feature that I can't help but dismiss as a gimmick - it's got a laser built into it to theoretically line up with the line you've drawn on your workpiece. Which works in principle, IF the saw blade you're using meets their assumptions, and the waste is on the left (or right) of you as you're cutting. I mean, it's kinda neat in a gewgaw sort of way, but trying to figure out whether I need to offset my guide line and how much etc. takes WAY more mental math than simply drawing a line where I want to cut, setting the saw on there, lining the outside of the tooth of the blade up with the line, marking another line, and taking a piece of aluminum angle and C-clamping it to the workpiece. The old-school way ensures a dead straight cut every time, too.
nate
(if I'd bought it myself, I would have gone for an old school worm-drive Skil, but don't look a gift saw in the dust collector or something like that, esp. when you've got some shelves to make.)
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