Problem With Laying Shingles

I ripped off my old roof and got it ready for laying the new shingles. I planned on starting with a whole shingle, next course -4 inches, next course -8. Then back to the full shingle.
With the 3/8 inch overhang required, each row of shingles is 24 feet and 7/8 inches. If I use full shingles, I come up 7/8 of an inch short at the end of the row. Should I just allow a bit of space between each shingle to make up the 7/8 of an inch over the 24 foot run or???
Willi
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I would go with "or". Lay your starter about 8 inches past the rake, then first shingle 2 inches over the rake edge, go up to the peak, and temporarily tack another shingle 2 inches over the rake also. Snap a chalkline on the decking from the end of the top shingle to the end of the bottom shingle. About 6 inches in from where you just snapped a line, you'll see a notch or slit at the top edge of each shingle. Snap another line between these notches from top to bottom. Use both chalk lines carefully to line up vertically the right edges of your first run-up to the peak. Stop every 5 shingles to lay a guide shingle along the rake at your desired overhang, and with a sharp hook knife, trim your rake. Save your cut-offs to fill in the other rake edge. Tom
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The package will give you the installation instructions. They always in my experience specify starting the first course with a part shingle. How much to cut off depends on the appearance you want.
A sign of an amatuer job is where all the cutouts line up in a straight line going vertically up the roof. Much better looking is where they line up going in a diagonal. Again the package will tell how to choose either one depending on the amount you cut off the starting shingle.
Yes, I realize that does not answer your question. The few times I had that problem, I would cut a piece to fit.
Another tip that I learned way too many jobs down the line is;
Buy 'shingle hatchet' . One eliminates all the eyeballing, chalklining, etc and speeds things up tremendously. Well on a big roof you might still have to run a chalk line or two.
Harry K
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I'd say the sign of an fairly amateur job is where the slots _don't _quite_ line up in a straight line. The offset slot method is for the_real_ amateur (sorry) that can't lay a straight vertical. And yes, you're right, it wouldn't obviate the OP's problem. Tom
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Dunno where you are from but I have never seen a pro lay with verticle line up. Appearance of the diagonal is far, far more attractive than straight up the roof. I worked for roofers in both Tx and Wa. Of course you could argue they do it that way because it is easier but it still comes down to 'the pros don't do it'.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

I agree with Harry. If one of my clients insists on 3 tab shingles, I will not allow the roofers to lay them where the slots line up. For one reason; this promotes water running straight down the roof in the grooves and causes premature erosion of the shingles in those channels. Offsetting the slots spreads the runoff along the entire surface of the shingles. Didn't anyone tell you that in roofing school?
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Nope. Tom
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The shingles will wear just as fast either way, trust me. What I believe the 6 inch "vertical slot' method provides for best is the draining water to be as far from the butt edge of the shingle as possible when it hits the slot. Does this make sense? Tom
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Well, your (or my) argument that they do it because it's easier certainly holds water. I have no idea why the folks that taught me to roof taught me the vertical slot method, maybe it was slightly easier to temp over at the end of the day if rain was threatening, or whatever. I just hope the OP has enough info to deal with his little 7/8ths of an inch problem! Tom
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Why not just start the 1st course at -2 inches, then -6, then -10? It will mean more cutting, but I don't think cutting one to 7/8 inch will hold to the roof that well.
Of course, I'm not a roofer, and my advice is worth every penny you paid for it :)
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wrote:

Definitely not. Put them next to each other and trim the end one.
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