problem with garage door opener

My single door garage opener is Sear brand. It works, but not all the time, specially during winter time.
It seems not having enough juice to jerk open the garage door. It needs to take more than a couple of pushes of button to open the door. It helps opening the door when I pull the gliding lock off the hook before I push the button.
Winter time is worse, it takes forever bushing the button and it never opens. Please help.
Thanks a lot.
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decouple the opener from the door and raise it by hand to see if it sticks or your springs may be too weak to help lift it. If it binds find out why. Lubricate the rollers with a good spray lube also. If it is a chain drive a bit of spray on white lithium grease would help some. Careful not to much it drips on your car.
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A quick check on the springs is to raise the door by hand to the half way point.
It should stay balanced there if the springs are ok.
Charlie
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It may be sticking, but it may also be that the up force is adjustable and currently set too low. Look for adjustments on the unit.
lijie wrote:

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Thank you very much for your input.
I tried new spring. Replaced old one. Old one is slack. But new spring didn't help the door opener, not even a bit, unfortunately.
My garage door opener funtions like this: I push button. Each pushing of button, the opener will respond in "Gee-Gee" noise without moving the chain at all. It needs 10-15 or more button-pushing to move the chain finally. Once it starts moving the chain and the garage door, the next immediate couple of door movements will funtion totally fine like all good without any problems, both opening and closing, until next time.
It maybe sticking, but where could it be sticking? I can not find a place. I spray a lot of DW-40. It didn't help. I don't know if that one has adjustable mode. I highly doubt it has it. Any thoughts, please help! Thanks a lot!
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I'm going to speculate here, so take this for what it's worth.
There's a gear in the motor that engages the chain to accomplish the lifting. When my springs were shot, the result was that several teeth were stripped off of this gear (which is plastic). When I tried to open the door the motor would hum but no movement took place. The gear had to be replaced.
I wonder if your gear isn't totally stripped, but a portion of the teeth are missing. In that situation, if the gear was in the "right" position when you engaged the motor it would work. That might explain why sometimes it works fine on the 1st push and other times you have to repeatedly engage it before you get any action.
Tony

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On 21 Aug 2003 20:35:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (lijie) wrote (with possible editing):

Another guess, since I have no idea who made it for Sears. There may be a tension switch assembly which is designed to stop the motor under two conditions:
    A. Lowering the door and an object is struck.     B. Raising the door and an excessive amount of force is needed.
It sounds like the latter condition. The two trigger points are adjustable. Usually there are two holes in the rail at the top of the motor assembly (one on each side) behind which is an adjustable screw. In some cases there is an arrow stamped beside the hole and something written to describe what happens when you turn the screw in the indicated direction. In your case, if you determine that you can raise the door easily (manually), condition B applies and you might want to adjust the mechanism to apply a bit more force before the motor quits.
-- Larry snipped-for-privacy@lmr.com
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Thank you very mush for your input.
The opener connects to a chain, and the chain moves a gliding bar on the rack. The gliding bar is engaged with a metal hook, which connected to the garage door. When gliding bar and hook locking together, the garage door start to move along with the movement of the chain and open and close the door. When gliding bar and hook disengaged, the gliding bar will move itself back forth on the rack without move the door. I hope you know what I am talking about.
Here is more interesting observation. My problem with my garage door opener seems related somewhat with the connection of the bar to the hook. When the bar is off the hook, it is much more easy to start the opener to move the bar itself. Once the gliding bar engaged hook during motions, it will drag the door to open or close easily. When the bar or hook in a locking in position, it will take 10-15 push of button to start move both of them.
Now each time we want open our garage door, we have to physically go to the door, pull the string disengage the hook with the gliding bar. We have to come back push the button to move the opener, normally the opener will move the bar in 1-2 pushes. After the opener running, bar is gliding, engaging the hook in motion, dragging the door to open. When we close the door, we have to physically disengage the bar and hook, everything work in a reverse way.
But if we want to open the garage door directly, we have to do at least 10-15 pushes of button.
Please help. Thanks a great deal!
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snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (lijie) wrote in message

I would suspect it is the bushing where the sprocket shaft comes down through the motor head. When they get worn they will cause the shaft to bind & when you run the opener w/o being connected to the door you have taken the load off the shaft. It may also cause the gear (that is also probably worn all the way around) to separate away from the motor shaft gear. Remove the chain from the sprocket on top of motor head to inspect the pushing & to see if the shaft will wobble back & forth. Therefore when the shaft is straight up & down the opener works & when it moves forward it won't open the door. The shaft, chain sprocket, gear, bushing, & bushing plate is sold as an assembly. It depends on the age of your unit if the part is still available. They had a design change a number of years ago to the bushing plate, the size of the gear, and other items & therefore the two are not interchangeable.
Doordoc www.DoorsAndOpeners.com
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