Problem with connecting members between roof over deck and eaves of house

Family member's house is settling slightly while the deck in back is not, and the galvanized steel L-shaped members that drop down from the roof of her deck to connect beneath her eaves are not happy about the whole affair. Need to replace said members with new ones that drop down slightly more than those currently in place, but I have no idea what to even call these things or where to look for them. If anyone understands what I am describing (or trying to describe) please enlighten me as to what they are called and where to look for replacements. Those currently in place are like an L on its back, dropping down about ten inches to get below the eaves, and then extending over about 14 inches to connect beneath said eaves. Looks like 1/4 inch thick galvanized steel, maybe two and an half inches wide. Something like eight or ten of these critters, spanning twenty or twenty-five feet. *Any* help would be greatly appreiated.
Thanks,
Dave
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On 1/30/2011 9:10 AM, Dave wrote:

This being winter, more likely that the deck is moving UP- frost heave can make slabs and pilings move all over the place. How old is house, how old is deck, what climate are you in, etc. Need more info to make even and educated guess. I would not recommend changing any components until I was sure what was going on, and since deck and house move relative to each other, I'd try to find a solution that allowed for that. You describe deck as being metal, which makes me suspect one of those sunroom thing, versus a metal-framed deck you can walk on. If it isn't very old, I'd start with getting the company that put it in back there.
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aem sends...

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I know absolutely nothing about this.
Should you disconnect the deck from the house before something breaks? Weill the deck fall over, or caulked seams come apart, if it's not conected to the house. Ruined caulked seams might not be as bad as whatever breaks, unless it has broken as much as it can already.
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Are you saying that the"deck" has a roof over it and the deck roof is higher than the house roof where the two come together??? A photo or two would make a lot of sense if you really want a knowledgeable reply.
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