Problem tightening carriage bolts.

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On 5/5/2011 1:56 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Thinner than the round carriage bolt, sure, but not countersunk as a plow bolt is in a plow share. A scoop could still catch the edge of an elevator bolt.
Indeed, the application is the key; I was speaking of the wagon bed usage of the previous poster re: common usage of a carriage bolt and commenting that, _IF_ (the proverbial big if) there were the thickness for the countersink a plow bolt could be make totally flush w/ the floor (or even slightly under) and avoid the scoop catch problem entirely. Never seen it, however (altho certainly have a multitude of plow bolts on the planters and other tillage implements even though w/ no- and low-till practice of today the number of different implements that actually turn the soil is far fewer than used to be 30 years ago)...
--
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I don't know squat about plow shares, but I have used Grade 8 fender washers and hex bolts to "counter sink" (read: "dent") boards so that the elevator bolts will be flush with the surface.
If the wood is too hard the elevator bolts tend to break before "counter sinking" themselves, but a hex bolt and Grade 8 fender washer will usually get the job done.
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Carriage bolts also have better aerodynamic properties than hex head bolts. Not as good as elevator bolts, but certainly better than hex head.
When using hex head bolts and aerodymics need to be considered, always ensure that a point faces into the wind, not a flat side.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

They are also useful for secure installations where one side of the fastener will be exposed to a non-secured location, such as on a pet door.
Jon
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You said two very different things:
"I have several 1/2" carriage bolts that I can not tighten"
and
"Is there a trick to removing these bolts?"
What are you trying to do? Tighten them or loosen them?
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Sometimes a air impact gun will get them as it "hammers" the nut a bit. If you are putting these in wood make sure you don't drill the hole bigger than the bolt. You want square part to be forced into the hole. Metal backets for docks usually have square holes so that carrage bolts work with them. If you have a round hole in metal then you want to use hex head.
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On removal, try an air impact. Hold with a pair of vise grips, weld a piece off rebar to the top, or slide a screwdriver under it so the turning of the bolt wedges the screwdriver tighter. If they are corroded, a SawZall or grinder may be the only way. Reinstall them with an air impact. It will tighten them a fraction of a turn at a time, and possibly get what you want. Use lock washers.
Steve
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They make some very nice bolts with round heads like carriage bolts, and a hex or Allen or star depression on top.
Steve
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If it doesn't have a plain rounded head with a square collar/neck below it, it is no longer a carriage bolt -- it becomes a very large "machine screw" at that point once you can use some sort of tool on the head of the fastener...
~~ Evan
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@OP:
Dude, it sounds like the wood on your dock supports is starting to get mushy and rotten around the carriage bolts...
If this is a dock you take apart every year to store, you could salvage what you have by installing some kind of metal guide tube for the bolts into the wood with epoxy to prevent further rot...
You could epoxy the bolts in place but depending on how your dock is put together that might make taking it apart impossible...
The best way to remove stuck nuts off bolts you can replace is to use an oxy-acetylene torch and burn them off if you have one and know how to use it properly...
~~ Evan
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