Problem tightening carriage bolts.

Page 1 of 2  
I have several 1/2" carriage bolts that I can not tighten because the head of the bolts rotates. Is there a trick to removing these bolts? I suspect I could cut slots in the head of the bolt or in the body of the screw or cut the nut off. Any other ideas? Once I get them out, what is the best way to fix the problem?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/3/2011 6:50 PM, noname87 wrote:

Ya' named the choices other than if you can manage to get enough of a hold w/ pair of vice grips on the head.
As for fixing the problem, that depends on the application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's also 'weld a hex nut to the head' - if he has that skill and tool.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't think of that. Unfortunately welding is not part of my skill set. I wonder if I could achieve the same effect with expoxy.
These bolts hold the supports for my dock together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 3 May 2011 23:03:15 -0700 (PDT), noname87

Take an angle grinder and grind off the nut. Have a pitcher of water handy because the wood will smoke and could catch on fire, but just douse it with water when the nut is off. Of course, you'll have to replace the bolt and nut with a new one later, but a standard hex head bolt with a large washer on both sides works well.
I dont think epoxy is strong enough, but JB Weld might work. I have also drilled a hole in the head and driven in a nail on an angle thru the head into the wood. But that depends on how rusted the nut is to the bolt. They also sell nut splitters, I never had much luck with them but I may have had a cheap one.
Grinding is normally the quickest and easiest.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 04 May 2011 03:32:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Plus one on that. Lose the carriage bolts in this application.

Grind it now or spend a 1/2 day trying everything else, and grind it this afternoon.<g>
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2011 3:32 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote: ...

That's an idea I hadn't ever thought of (the nail in a hole, that is)...
I've used the nut splitter successfully, but only on larger than 3/8" w/ any ease.
For the fix, certainly the machine bolt/washer works; for the appearances sake on occasion I've used washer w/ square hold and stayed w/ the carriage bolt. If necessary, one can use the nail-in-a-hole thru the washer for turning resistance. Generally in that case I'll also plug the original hole w/ a harder wood insert for the new bolt shoulders to have something to bite into.
Was sorta' figuring the deck or similar would be application; since most is either treated or cedar or other very soft woods, the holes don't tend to last long before do get rounded over. A piece of fir or some handy hardwood can work for the purpose w/o too much effort.
But, the 'cheap 'n cheery' way is to simply go to the machine bolt, agreed.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the suggestions. Some of the ideas, I never would hane thought of.
Since some of the nuts are recessed into the wood, I will need to try several of these ideas. If I can remove the nut, I can use a hex bolt or counter bore the hole to get to fresh wood. Since these are galvanized carriage bolt, most are not rusted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yep. Until I bought a cordless Dremel kit with a boatload of accessories, I didn't have any idea how useful it could be. The cut-off disks and the little wire brushes do an awful lot of work around here. The screw extractor and matching drill get a lot of use. So do the sanding drums and the soft bristle brush which makes cleaning gunked up mouse rollers a snap. Just got a flex extension for mine. The only gripe I have about the cordless models is that the switch is designed
HI OFF LO
when it should be
OFF LO HI.
Sometimes it takes my twitching fingers two or three tries to get it to the center OFF position. Recently upgraded to the LiON model. Much better performance than the old NiCad unit, especially if it's been lying around for a while unused. I always had to recharge the NiCad unit before use but the LiON model always has enough charge left to handle at least a three minute job. Makes a difference.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

3: Take the stop out of the switch and let it spin all the way 'round.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like the torque washer idea. Unfortunately, I cannot locate a supplier for the 1/2" size. Any recommendations?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
noname87 wrote:

Does the bolt stem stick out past the nut? You might be able to keep the bolt from turning with a pair of vice grips on the stem if so. I wonder if there would be some sort of soft (brass) washer that could help fill the hole where the bolt head fits. That might keep a new one from turning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
noname87 wrote:

1. Put them in hard wood
2. Get some of the little steel jobbies with prongs that hammer into the hole (sort of like "T" nuts) and which have a square hole for the carriage bolt neck.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Torque washers, presumably. http://www.mcfeelys.com/torque-washers I've never seen one in person, but they appeared in the mkfeelys catalog that was part of the junk mail barrage after my first HF online order some years ago. I wish I'd known about them earlier.
m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use them all the time in pt lumber. You just need to make sure the hole is just the right size so the square part under the head is forced into the wood.
But I think they are orginally designed to be used in metal stuff with a square hole so that the carriage bolt is held properly. My guess is they originally had a specific application on horse drawn carriages.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2011 8:16 AM, jamesgangnc wrote: ...

Ding, ding, ding...we have a winner!!! :)
Of course, they were carried over in a lot of early horseless carriages, farm equipment and other applications, too. They smooth, clean head is of great value in some applications as well as simply the appearance.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They work good in wood _for the first use_, i.e., tightening. The problem arises when one wants to remove them.
One of the common places they were/are found is in the bed of carts, wagons, etc to give a smooth floor so stuff slides out and a shovel doesn't catch on the bolt head.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2011 9:19 AM, Harry K wrote: ...

The scoop _still_ catches... :) (even though not so badly/often)
Plow bolts are the true answer there.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2011 9:28 AM, dpb wrote:

Of course, problem w/ a plow bolt in many of those applications is that the thickness of the metal was/is not enough to allow the necessary countersink; hence the carriage bolt w/ the bearing surface of the head as least obtrusive alternative.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, an elevator bolt would be even less obtrusive. However, carriage bolts do come in much larger sizes than elevator bolts, so, as usual, it really depends on the application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.