Privacy Fence w/ Post 10' Apart


I have an existing 6' privacy fence. Had to take down a 20' section to bring in a new shed, and because I wanted to rebuild the existing gate.
Everywhere I read that the posts should be no more than 8' apart. I think due to sagging.
But I have found that a decent size pickup truck can't fit through a 8' opening. So I want a section of the fence to be 10' foot wide. So if I ever need to bring a truck in again, I can take down the section, and the truck can have 10' to drive through.
Any advice on building a section of the fence using 10' stringers instead of 8'? How do I prevent sagging? Should I use double 2x4's? Should I upgrade to 2x6's? Should I use cross-supports?
Thanks,
Chris
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wrldruler wrote:

1. Put a post in the middle, but not sunk in the ground. It merely rests on a concrete block. 2. Use three or four stringers instead of two. Turn them such that the 4" side is vertical. 3. Use diagonal bracing. 4. Don't put up a fence, put up a gate (that's closed most of the time). Each half of the gate would be five feet with suitable diagonal bracing.
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HeyBub wrote:

For the middle post, you could get fancy ...... pour a concrete pad with a square hole in the middle to receive the post but the post will not be embedded. That way the post is braced laterally and vert.
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wrldruler wrote:

Make one post removable, either fitting into a well-drained socket or over a stub, and put those 2 panels on quick-releases of some kind. That is what they do for the security perimeter fence at work, to be able to let the big yellow iron things in for whatever the repair project of the year is. Tractor Supply or similar should have suitable bits in their iron-mongery section- this is a common problem for corrals and barns and such. You could even just mount those two panels with bolts to L-shaped plates lagged into the posts- for once-a-year use, an hour with a socket wrench shouldn't be a big deal.
-- aem sends...
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Great ideas.
What would you recommend I use as a concrete form to make this well- drained socket? What do i pour the concrete around?
aemeijers, do you think Tractor Supply would have something I could use as a form?
Thanks
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What pickup do you have that doesn't fit through an 8' opening? Lou
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wrldruler wrote:

If not, you could make something out of sheet metal, or use a piece of the PVC stuff they sell for skinning fenceposts at the fancy houses horsey people like. A real fence company might have a rust-proof something you can leave in the ground, probably made by Simpson. Dig the hole extra deep, put gravel in the bottom, drop the socket in, and pour the concrete around it, squaring it all up as you go, of course. My mailbox post sits in something like that. I haven't pulled it out of the ground, because I keep forgetting to buy the replacement.
Other idea- If you have a way to round off the bottom of the post, a piece of pipe would work. Are you patient enough to do it by hand with a spokeshave, after lopping the corners off with a handsaw? It'd be trivial on a lathe, but few people have ones that long. 2nd other idea, if you can end-drill the post- put a steel pin in it, and use a smaller pipe in the ground. The panels will keep it from rotating. Lotsa ways to do it- sometimes it helps to watch a few McGyver episodes first. :^/
-- aem sends....
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wrldruler wrote:

Scrap plywood or concrete edging stuff sold where they sell concrete :o)
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