Priming my New Drywall


Now that my basement drywall is all mudded & sanded, I need to prime it and would like some advice.
I have one of those smaller 2200psi airless sprayers (borrowed from a friend) that has the hose to stick in the paint can. I'm going to try that hoping it works OK for me.
I have no worries with overspray in my basement, except for the multitude of outlets and light switches I have in my walls. Any advice on a quick and easy way to protect them from the paint sprayer? I obviously don't want to get paint inside my boxes if I don't have to.
Also, what is a good, sprayable primer to use on my new drywall? Should I use latex, water, or oil based? Should I need to thin it? Should I expect to need more than one coat? I plan on painting with a relatively light colored latex after priming is complete.
I'm estimating I'll need about 6 gallons of primer for the first coat...maybe more if this sprayer puts it on heavy or not.
Thanks for any feedback.
Kevin
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I like working with Sherwin Williams products. I believe latex *is* water based. How many coats depends on how good You and the sprayer are together. If the fan shaped spray leaves lines at the outside edge the tip may be worn, always keep the gun moving when spraying,start with fast movement and gradually find the proper speed..Thinning depends on how thick/thin the paint is to begin with and the spray rigs' ability to draw it from the bucket/can. I've heard Painters use the term "dusting" many times referring to a very light primer coat,,personally I like primer coverage that prevents the color coat from soaking into the wall..The primer can be tinted the same as color coat or to a varying degree but that does'nt help to get an even sheen when using any paint with a gloss level. Have plenty of warm water to flush the sprayer completely till no paint is left in the rig at all..If spraying is stopped before complete drop the gun into water to keep the tip wet for short periods while You attend to the problem. Have plenty of light and someone to keep it at an angle to the area You're working on..Check/clean the filters in the rig and gun before,during if needed and after just for good measure..Lastly have one more helper there with a roller to backroll if there are problems with the sprayer but You still want to make good time. Sorry if I gave a long reply,,I'm sure there's alot more tricks n tips out there too.
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2" masking tape should suffice to protect your switch boxes and outlets. The paint won't do any harm to the wires and hopefully you have made all of your splices so you won't need to figure anything out later when you install devices.
One suggestion I can make about airless spraying is to strain your paint. I've seen many guys have to stop what they are doing to clean out the nozzle or hose. That cuts into your time considerably. I was on a job recently and the painter's helper was spraying primer with a brand new airless. I go out to my truck for some materials and come back a few minutes later and the guy is complaining about the clogged gun. I asked him if strained the paint. He said no, but he stirred it really well. He wound up finishing with a roller while his boss cleaned the airless. I think that you can buy strainers at a paint store, but if not some folded layers of cheese cloth will work.
Many years ago a painter recommended Muralo latex primer to me for new unfinished walls. It did a great job of sealing with one coat. It is thin enough to use in an airless.
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| > Now that my basement drywall is all mudded & sanded, I need to prime | > it and would like some advice.
use bare drywall primer I prefer Ben Moore acrylic latex for walls, oil primer for wood.
| > | > I have one of those smaller 2200psi airless sprayers (borrowed from a | > friend) that has the hose to stick in the paint can. I'm going to try | > that hoping it works OK for me. | > | > I have no worries with overspray in my basement, except for the | > multitude of outlets and light switches I have in my walls. Any | > advice on a quick and easy way to protect them from the paint | > sprayer? I obviously don't want to get paint inside my boxes if I | > don't have to. | > | > Also, what is a good, sprayable primer to use on my new drywall? | > Should I use latex, water, or oil based? Should I need to thin it? | > Should I expect to need more than one coat? I plan on painting with a | > relatively light colored latex after priming is complete. | > | > I'm estimating I'll need about 6 gallons of primer for the first | > coat...maybe more if this sprayer puts it on heavy or not.
6 gal. will cover aprox. 2000 sq. ft. sprayed on or 3000 sq. ft. rolled on.
| > | > Thanks for any feedback. | > | > Kevin | > | | 2" masking tape should suffice to protect your switch boxes and outlets. | The paint won't do any harm to the wires and hopefully you have made all of | your splices so you won't need to figure anything out later when you install | devices. | | One suggestion I can make about airless spraying is to strain your paint. | I've seen many guys have to stop what they are doing to clean out the nozzle | or hose. That cuts into your time considerably. I was on a job recently | and the painter's helper was spraying primer with a brand new airless. I go | out to my truck for some materials and come back a few minutes later and the | guy is complaining about the clogged gun. I asked him if strained the | paint. He said no, but he stirred it really well. He wound up finishing | with a roller while his boss cleaned the airless. I think that you can buy | strainers at a paint store, but if not some folded layers of cheese cloth | will work. | | Many years ago a painter recommended Muralo latex primer to me for new | unfinished walls. It did a great job of sealing with one coat. It is thin | enough to use in an airless. |
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snipped-for-privacy@blah.com wrote:

Use a primer designed for new drywall like:
http://www.usg.com/navigate.do?ichronicleId 01197e80033e00
Or any similar primer that says it equalizes porosity and surface texture - otherwise you might end up with visible joints, because drywall and mud have different absorption characteristics.
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I ended up getting Olympic PVA Primer.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId0494-86-78200A/05&lpage=none
What does PVA stand for?
Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@blah.com wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId0494-86-78200A/05&lpage=none
Polyvinyl alcohol?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinyl_alcohol
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Thanks.
Anybody have any other ideas for covering up my outlets while I spray other than tape?
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There is at least one company that makes reusable outlet and switch box covers for this purpose. I don't recall the name, but I would try calling some electrical supply companies. I guess you could cut out your own cardboard covers and screw them to the boxes.
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wrote:

How about covering the wall plates with wallpaper and putting them back on before painting. Remove that afterward and have clean paint-free outlets.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@blah.com wrote:

Cut some index cards or corrugated cardboard the size of the opening for the receptacles, fasten with one screw.
There are primers specifically for new drywall, usually latex. Shop for a good brand at a paint store, follow label, it should give advice for sprayer. If not, ask at the store.
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