primer oil or latex

I replaced a chunk of siding on my house and now I need to prime and paint it
Question in my mind is, should I go with a latex or oil primer? I only ask because while I KNOW the paint on my house now is latex, when I get the siding painted again I'm not sure if at that point I should go with an oil or latex paint.
I have heard that oil paints are increasingly not used anymore. So I'm wondering if I go with latex now, am I stuck using latex in the future or if I go with an oil now, will I have to reprime with latex later.
I'm just wondering what would be the best route to go given that 1) the current paint job is bad quality 2) I will repaint the house in the future.
Also, when painting cedar trim INSIDE the house (window trim and the like) and you want to keep the natural cedar color - would a normal polyeurethane coat do the job or is there something specific to cedar?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oil paint is getting more difficult to find because of government restrictions for air quality. Some regions are not allowed to sell oil based paint because of hte VOC content. You may as well get used to using latex now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

ABSOLUTELY!! We should all do our part and stop using oil paint. That way, we'll be able to have more cars :)
We should also stop putting in lawns...watering them reduces the number of golf courses (or is it vice versa, I forget). We could also flush just once a day.
Any way we can pass a law against congress? ______________
Note: above comments not directed toward any poster, just the idjits in DC, state capitols, cities and towns.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Latex dominates the marketplace and is fine for most siturations including yours. Oils can still be found at a real paint store and are still good for problem surfaces or surfaces that are expected to get wet like bathrooms.
You say that you are replacing the siding. This suggest a problem with water damage? This would be the type of situation where an oil might be used. Ultimately it's your call. I rountinely use an oil primer on a surface that is expected to get wet.

No, you will not be stuck. It is good practice and quite common to put latex over an oil primer. It is considered not so good to do the reverse. Before anyone disagrees, of course it can be done just not recommended.

It is unusual to use cedar inside the house but Poly is OK. There is no finish specific to cedar. A penetrating stain is often used on cedar in an outdoor situation but I haven't seen it used indoors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The questions I have about oil primer covered by latex:
1. Different expansion rates. Won't they eventually separate? 2. Oil primer will prevent house vapor from leaving walls.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Latex paint over oil-based primer has been standard practice in house painting. The only thing about it is that you have to paint over the primer within about 24 hours of application, because if it dries too much before the paint is applied, it won't adhere properly. But I'd make a quick phone call to a paint shop (not HD or Lowe's) to verify anything you read here.
Art wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It looks like you are asking me.
1. I don't know that they do have different expansions rates but maybe you do? My claims are based upon experience with paint not with the chemistry or physics of paint. I leave such matters to the the paint manufacturers. Any paint will fail "eventually" regardless of the particulars. That's the downside of all paint.
2. The siding itself is not supposed to breath although accomodation is often made for ventilation beneath the siding with weep holes and such. It is suppose to be an impenetrable barrier against the moisture, ideally excluding it entirely.
Cheers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Alright, thank for the tip and thanks to the rest of the responders.
Actually all my window trim is done in cedar, it contrasts nicely with my interior paint, but my cat drools on it and so I get these water stains where he sits and plots his schemes against the birds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on what wood the siding is made from.
If you have cedar or redwood, you need to use an oil primer to seal the wood. Otherwise, you'll have red-brown stains bleeding through the primer, and eventually through the topcoat as well.
Anything else, you can take your choice of latex or oil; I'd recommend latex due to easy cleanup, lower price, easy cleanup, faster drying, easy cleanup, better for the environment, and easy cleanup.
The topcoat can, and probably should, be latex regardless of which type of primer you use.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Alright, thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.