primer for re-painting old plaster?

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We want to re-paint a room. Walls are old plaster (presumably original, so ~90 yo), with what looks like 3 layers of paint. Based on age, the paint is likely oil-base. Some of the paint has pealed to bare plaster; the rest seems well-bonded. So, primer has to bond to both plaster and old paint.
Question: is there a preferrable primer to use? Or ones to avoid?
Thanks
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| Question: is there a preferrable primer to use? Or ones to avoid? |
I wouldn't prime it at all. If it's glossy you might want to wash it with hot solution of TSP. Then use some joint compound to even out the peeled areas. I usually prime if I'm doing new drywall, but not for small areas of joint compound. You can just spot-prime the compound spots, if necessary, with the finish paint. (Assuming you're using water- base paint this time.)
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On 12/29/2015 11:49 AM, George wrote:

*3* layers of paint? I'd be looking to sand or otherwise "fill" some of those voids so they don't "bleed through" (texturally) the final paint job.

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George submitted this idea :

REAL plaster walls? Redwood lath? Love it!
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wrote:

Try not to get too excited. This is kind of old-school (1920's?) skim coat, about 1/4" thick. In the right light, the lath telegraphs through. (We prefer not to notice.)
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| >REAL plaster walls? Redwood lath? Love it! | | Try not to get too excited. This is kind of old-school (1920's?) skim | coat, about 1/4" thick. In the right light, the lath telegraphs | through. (We prefer not to notice.)
I think it may depend on where one lives. I deal with mostly horsehair plaster and lath. I occasionally deal with plaster on concrete on metal lath -- the stuff that came after horsehair. That's much worse to work with. When I come across drywall it's a treat. So much less dust and work involved in the demo.
From the sounds of it you might want to consider putting drywall over your walls. (Which may be fairly easy or very involved, depending on how you have to deal with the trim.)
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George used his keyboard to write :

Do you want to preserve the plaster or make a solid wall with as little labor and expense possible?
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George presented the following explanation :

Try scraping off the paint and use a stone or metal wall scraper to get the old paint off, then use driwall topping compound and a trowel to smooth the wall.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ROBERTS-10-294-Floor-and-Wall-Scraper-4W-x-19-L-/381023848916?hash=item58b6ca89d4:g:myEAAOSwwE5WYpK-
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| Try scraping off the paint and use a stone or metal wall scraper to get | the old paint off, then use driwall topping compound and a trowel to | smooth the wall. |
Are you serious? He said most of it's stuck. What you're proposing probably means several *days* of scraping work, then skim coating the entire wall with joint compound after getting it hacked up. All for no good reason. Anyone who had to do such a thing for some reason would be better off drywalling over it.
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Mayayana submitted this idea :

I never said it would be easy. Are you afraid of a little work? ^^
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| > Are you serious? He said most of it's stuck. What | > you're proposing probably means several *days* of | > scraping work, then skim coating the entire wall | > with joint compound after getting it hacked up. | > All for no good reason. Anyone who had to do such | > a thing for some reason would be better off drywalling | > over it. | | I never said it would be easy. Are you afraid of a little work? ^^
Because a job is difficult and strenuous that makes it useful? You're not making any sense. It's a cruel practical joke to suggest what you suggested. Unless you really don't know any better. In that case you shouldn't be giving people advice.
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Mayayana was thinking very hard :

That is how I would prepare a plaster wall. Your milage may vary.
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Oren was thinking very hard :

I don't believe in painting over primed plaster. After 30+ years as a plasterer, I avoid priming plaster walls, both interior and exterior. A bit of work and you avoid old paint lifting after priming.
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Oren wrote on 12/29/2015 :

If it were savable, yes. You don't see original redwood lath and plaster very often. If it's crumbly and falling off, no. There are other types of plaster and I'm assuming it's hardwall plaster, not thinwall plaster.
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On 2015-12-29 6:48 PM, Eagle wrote:

Try the crap in my house, renovations are a pain in the ass, it is a wire mesh lath with the plaster over the top of that. Gloves and the right tools are a key for the parts of it I have redone, otherwise expect blood.
--
Froz...

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FrozenNorth pretended :

I worked in California, so there are no basements to speak of, and most of the interior plaster walls are 2'X4' 1/2" wall board with metal mesh used in inside corners and fiberglass tape on joints. Gypsum plaster is spread over that lath and when cured and dry, "puttycoat" is spread over the gypsum resulting in a very hard wall. Thin wall is spread over gypsum green board with fiberglass mesh tape on all joints and inside corners resulting in a VERY HARD plaster wall to paint over. Sometimes pigment is added to the mud so no painting is required. Today, most homes are driwall and spray textured.
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 11:00:30 AM UTC-5, Eagle wrote:

I have very similar walls in my 1956-era house in the northeast US. The "2'X4' 1/2" wall board" that you mention is gypsum board, laid perpendicular to the studs (i.e. horizontal).
The insides of the walls look similar to this, although my gypsum boards are 6" (8"?) wide, not 2'. I'm not sure about the length. It's been a while since I tore any walls down, so the exact width and length of the gypsum board has been forgotten, but I'm confident that it is not 2', not even 1' wide.
http://inspectapedia.com/interiors/PlasterBoard31DFs.jpg
My walls measure about 3/4" thick. The metal mesh in the corners and at the ceiling junctions make certain types of repairs and/or renovations a real PITA. Patches in the open field need to be shimmed out to become flush with the rest of the wall/ceiling.
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On 2015-12-30 11:38 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

it extends floor to ceiling, wall to wall, the plaster is not in sheets, it is all built up in several layers and hand applied. Any reno, causes massive amounts of dust, and curse words.
--
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 11:57:27 AM UTC-5, FrozenNorth wrote:

I may not have been clear in my post. I have the paper covered gypsum boards on the studs (~3/8") and then hand-layered plaster over that, to the tune of another ~3/8". I actually like the slightly wavy surface of the plaster walls and ceilings.
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On 2015-12-30 12:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

few jobs, new kitchen,bathroom and expanding the front hall closet, at the same time it really made me admire the craftsmanship and skill that must have been required to do it.
Any slob, including me can put up drywall, but this stuff took a lot of skill to do. Even the lumber in my walls is actual rough cut 2x stock, that actually measures 2 inches.
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