Primer for new exterior stucco work. Use Cover Stain?

In replacing my roof, they tore out an 8 inch high swath of stucco, put in the flashing, applied the asphalt composition shingles and applied a new coat of stucco where they'd torn out the stucco. They told me it should be primed. I asked when and they said to wait a month. It's been about that long now and there's a few days of dry weather coming so I figure I should prime it now. There's about 60 square feet of it. I don't believe they put on two coats, like some roofing contractors said they would do in their bids. I see some cracking, already. But my other stucco is cracked in places. Well, the whole exterior needs a paint job but right now I figure I should prime that new stucco work.
I have a lot of Zinsser Cover Stain, and it says on the can that you can use it to prime masonry. I wonder if it would be a better idea to use something else. How long can I leave the primed stucco before applying exterior paint? I haven't decided on paint and colors for the house yet.
Comments, recommendations appreciated. If recommending a product, please suggest how much I should get and where (I live near Home Depot). Thanks!
Dan
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

The primer you select will tell you how long you can wait to paint. Ours was two or three days, max. We have stucco on concrete block, about 40 years old. When it was painted, the stucco had lots of fine, hairline cracks. Contractor used a brushable caulk to cover the cracks - 4 years and they haven't reappeared. When I was reading up in prep for our project, acryllic was said to be best for masonry because it allows a little moisture to breathe out of the masonry and lessens likelihood of blistering. Our contractor rinsed with bleach, then pressure washed, as we had lots of peeling paint. One coat prime, one coat semi. Porter Paint, not my choice but it is a good job and looks good so far. The contractor had wanted to put on two coats, but condo board said one. Fine job. Any good brand of paint should have a product for masonry.
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Norminn wrote:

The condo board _limited_ the number of coats you could put on to _one_?! You have a very, very stupid condo board. The finish coat is the wear coating, the primer is a bonding coat. You would have gotten much more life out of the two coats.
R
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Small condo assn, even split. One owner, the deadbeat, owns three units. His control freak pal runs the show, with his total support. Together they had half the votes. The deadbeat owned a million-dollar sailboat, has a new home in Bahamas, and probably owns a couple code enforcement people. And they play hardball. Now, back to your question, two coats cost more so they took the least expensive. Hubby and I interviewed contractors and I knew in about 15 seconds I wanted to do business with the guy, who also turned out to be low bidder :o) The previous paint job, put on without pressure washing or cleaning of any kind, was peeling in sheets. Whomever did the small amount of caulking put caulk around the outside of window screens that had been screwed on :o) The responsible owners were long a minority to trust fund babies and their boozer kids ran the show. Our one coat of prime and one coat of paint was done by Professionals who knew how to paint and gave a damn. Hubby and I invented a system for capturing all the peeling paint we knew would make a horrendous mess when the building was pressure washed. Even impressed the contractor. Also involved the paint company, as they inspected the prep as part of the warranty process. It took a while, but if the place looks tacky, new buyers will be hard to come by. The "in crowd" can get their friends interested. Only one owner is really interested in living here long term. Rest are waiting for someone who wants the land. Police have a nasty habit of threatening victims, so you have to watch your p's and q's. :o)
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Norminn wrote:

The condo board _limited_ the number of coats you could put on to _one_?! You have a very, very stupid condo board. The finish coat is the wear coating, the primer is a bonding coat. You would have gotten much more life out of the two coats.
R
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:The primer you select will tell you how long you can wait to paint. :Ours was two or three days, max.
So, what's a primer for stucco that won't have to be painted for a while, say a couple of years? Can I use Cover Stain straight or modified or should I buy a different product. I have gallons of Zinsser Cover Stain, oil based primer. However, I'll buy a specific product if someone can give me an incontrovertible recommendation. Thanks, y'all.
Dan
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

The general idea is not to put on primer until you are ready to put on paint. Primer alone does not accomplish much. Perhaps I don't understand your situation. The Zinsser website has all the info you can want, here: http://www.zinsser.com/tech_msds.asp
The info I read does not address the interval for priming and painting, but says you can usse any paint over your Cover Stain. If you apply latex over it, have to be sure it is totally set. Also, oil primer would have to be put on a totally dry masonry (cured, of course). I've used a couple of different Zinsser primers, and have had very good results. Lots of folks swear by them, but they aren't any good if you skip prep.
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:Dan_Musicant wrote:
:> :> :> :The primer you select will tell you how long you can wait to paint. :> :Ours was two or three days, max. :> :> So, what's a primer for stucco that won't have to be painted for a :> while, say a couple of years? Can I use Cover Stain straight or modified :> or should I buy a different product. I have gallons of Zinsser Cover :> Stain, oil based primer. However, I'll buy a specific product if someone :> can give me an incontrovertible recommendation. Thanks, y'all. :> :> Dan: :The general idea is not to put on primer until you are ready to put on :paint. Primer alone does not accomplish much. Perhaps I don't :understand your situation. The Zinsser website has all the info you can :want, here: :http://www.zinsser.com/tech_msds.asp : :The info I read does not address the interval for priming and painting, :but says you can usse any paint over your Cover Stain. If you apply :latex over it, have to be sure it is totally set. Also, oil primer :would have to be put on a totally dry masonry (cured, of course). I've :used a couple of different Zinsser primers, and have had very good :results. Lots of folks swear by them, but they aren't any good if you :skip prep.
Thanks. However, I see no mention of stucco in the MSDS PDF for Cover Stain oil based primer. I guess I should use something else. I don't know why, but they told me I should prime the stucco after a month. They didn't mention paint. This was my roofer.
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MSDS is chemistry, health and environ hazards. Click on the button for technical TDB, Technical Data Bulletin for your product. I think what your roofer meant was to wait a month before you paint. Mortar has to cure about that long prior to most paints. Leaving an interval of a year or two gains chalking and weathering of your primer and lessens the adhesion of the paint, which is the main reason to have a primer in the first place.
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: :clipped :> :> Thanks. However, I see no mention of stucco in the MSDS PDF for Cover :> Stain oil based primer. I guess I should use something else. I don't :> know why, but they told me I should prime the stucco after a month. They :> didn't mention paint. This was my roofer.: :MSDS is chemistry, health and environ hazards. Click on the button for :technical TDB, Technical Data Bulletin for your product. I think what :your roofer meant was to wait a month before you paint. Mortar has to :cure about that long prior to most paints. Leaving an interval of a :year or two gains chalking and weathering of your primer and lessens the :adhesion of the paint, which is the main reason to have a primer in the :first place. He said prime, not paint. Maybe he didn't know. As my correction post said, I should have said the TDB, not the MSDS. It was the TDB I read that didn't refer to stucco for Cover Stain. I believe their Bullseye 1-2-3 does say it's OK with stucco, but I wonder if it's adequate. I think there are other primers maybe better suited. I saw a post (in this group, IIRC) that mentioned Sherwin-Williams Loxon or X-I-M.
I don't know if this still applies, but Tinman1332 in this NG said in 1999:
Sherwin Williams makes a masonry primer that is designed not to react to lime problems... Loxon or LoxOn.
X-I-M Products also makes a masonry sealer/conditioner/primer that can be used... X-I-M Masonry Sealer/Conditioner.
There are others which will perform the job, these two are better at resisting problems that may result from the stucco not being fully cured. All of the products would prefer you wait at least one week before applying.
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:Dan_Musicant wrote:
:> :> :> :The primer you select will tell you how long you can wait to paint. :> :Ours was two or three days, max. :> :> So, what's a primer for stucco that won't have to be painted for a :> while, say a couple of years? Can I use Cover Stain straight or modified :> or should I buy a different product. I have gallons of Zinsser Cover :> Stain, oil based primer. However, I'll buy a specific product if someone :> can give me an incontrovertible recommendation. Thanks, y'all. :> :> Dan: :The general idea is not to put on primer until you are ready to put on :paint. Primer alone does not accomplish much. Perhaps I don't :understand your situation. The Zinsser website has all the info you can :want, here: :http://www.zinsser.com/tech_msds.asp : :The info I read does not address the interval for priming and painting, :but says you can usse any paint over your Cover Stain. If you apply :latex over it, have to be sure it is totally set. Also, oil primer :would have to be put on a totally dry masonry (cured, of course). I've :used a couple of different Zinsser primers, and have had very good :results. Lots of folks swear by them, but they aren't any good if you :skip prep.
Correction: It was the TDB, not the MSDS (i.e. the Technical Data Bulletin for Cover stain). - - - - Thanks. However, I see no mention of stucco in the MSDS PDF for Cover Stain oil based primer. I guess I should use something else. I don't know why, but they told me I should prime the stucco after a month. They didn't mention paint. This was my roofer.
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:Dan_Musicant wrote:
:> :> :> :The primer you select will tell you how long you can wait to paint. :> :Ours was two or three days, max. :> :> So, what's a primer for stucco that won't have to be painted for a :> while, say a couple of years? Can I use Cover Stain straight or modified :> or should I buy a different product. I have gallons of Zinsser Cover :> Stain, oil based primer. However, I'll buy a specific product if someone :> can give me an incontrovertible recommendation. Thanks, y'all. :> :> Dan: :The general idea is not to put on primer until you are ready to put on :paint. Primer alone does not accomplish much. Perhaps I don't :understand your situation. The Zinsser website has all the info you can :want, here: :http://www.zinsser.com/tech_msds.asp : :The info I read does not address the interval for priming and painting, :but says you can usse any paint over your Cover Stain. If you apply :latex over it, have to be sure it is totally set. Also, oil primer :would have to be put on a totally dry masonry (cured, of course). I've :used a couple of different Zinsser primers, and have had very good :results. Lots of folks swear by them, but they aren't any good if you :skip prep.
It looks like the Zinsser primer that might work OK with stucco is Bullseye 1-2-3 water based primer. If there's a better product, someone please say so. Otherwise, I guess I'll buy a gallon of it tomorrow morning. Thanks.
Dan
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