Primer before wallpaper?

Currently the room is covered with that old '70s (fake?) wood paneling. I'm going to be pasting wall-liner (thick wallpaper that can be painted) over it. After doing some reading on how to hang wall paper, most websites say that all the walls need to first be primed. Is this necessary-- I thought that wallpaper paste is good enough to hold the stuff on well enough? If priming is necessary, does anyone have any suggestions about the type to use?
Thanks, Dan
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I would clean the walls, then prime with sizing. Sizing will allow the wallpaper to stick good and proper, but in the event that you want to change it or remove it someday (you will), the sizing will make that possible. Perry

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Yes, it should be cleaned of grease, lightly sanded, and primed. Sizing isn't really needed, as most papers are prepasted to some degree anyway. Use either a universal white prime, or a special white prime for wallpaper prep. They may be had in acrylic or thinner based formulas.

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Sizing has nothing to do with whether the paper is prepasted or not. It has everything to do with preparing the surface to receive paper rather than paint. Primer=paint, sizing=paper. Perry

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Perry wrote:

I would probably use a primer first as well, simply because it is over panelling (yuck). First, find out what the surface is. Next, read instructions for the paper being used. Likely that an oil primer would be advisable, after thoroughly degreasing and roughing the panelling. Vinyl coated? Waxed wood? The stuff the OP plans on using is pretty heavy, so it needs a thoroughly prepared base.
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D > Currently the room is covered with that old '70s (fake?) wood paneling. I'm D > going to be pasting wall-liner (thick wallpaper that can be painted) over D > it. After doing some reading on how to hang wall paper, most websites say D > that all the walls need to first be primed. Is this necessary-- I thought D > that wallpaper paste is good enough to hold the stuff on well enough? If D > priming is necessary, does anyone have any suggestions about the type to D > use?
I believe part of the usage of the primer is to ensure the paneling's surface is clean. A light sanding followed by thorough cleaning to wipe the dust off worked in the dining room and TV room in the basement here.
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Hi Dan
There are many reasons to use a primer for wallpaper, commonly called sizing. One would be to seal an otherwise porous wall (sometimes that old paneling had those grooves that were not sealed like the rest). Another would be to help the wallpaper paste to reach its strongest point. Another is to allow the wallpaper to be slid around on the wall. It is common to have to 'move' the wallpaper a fraction of an inch and if the wall is not sized, the paper will stick and maybe tear. If you are going to paint, it is especially important to size because without the sizing it is common for the paper to get wrinkles in it when you are smoothing it out. Those wrinkles would be impossible to remove. There are other reasons, but I am at the age where it will take a good nap to remember them.
Zinsser makes an excellent sizing/primer. A bit more than powder sizing (about 15 bucks) but well worth the cost, in my opinion.
Judy

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Another
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Thanks for all the responses... The ultimate goal is that I be able to paint the wall without seeing all the nasty paneling grooves. I just thought that the wall liner would be the best way. Since there is no drywall under it (not required up here by code apparrently), what are other alternatives to get a nice smooth, paintable finish that won't show all the panel groves? I've thought about maybe going and getting a ton of joint tape and compound and going over each groove, but I don't know that: a) it will solve the problem and produce a nice finish, and b) send be to a mental institution.
I'd like to do this on as cheap a budget to get the most reasonable result. Adding up all the wall (not counting doors and such) is about 61 feet, and the room is about 7 feet high (all covered with that dang panelling).
Any other suggestions? Thanks again, Dan
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Wallpaper size allows the paper to be removed later without tearing up the wall. Not a primer but really necessary.
wrote:

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I had the old fake "wood" paneling in my kitchen--actually it was paper with a wood grain printed on it over some kind of fiber board or something. The idea is to keep water from the wallpaper paste from getting onto the printed paper and separating it from the fiberboard underneath it--bubbling up, peeling off, etc. I used a latex primer, but maybe oil based would be better; after about five years, no problems, though. Didn't use size--seems like the primer would serve the same purpose.
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