Prime wallboard before spraying texture?

Is it necessary to prime bare wallboards before spraying orange peel texture? Why or why not?
My contractor says it's not needed, but I've read elsewhere that it's a good idea to prime first (no reason provided though).
Please help! Thanks.
-Ernesto
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wont hurt, might help.
randy

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wrote:

here you go again offering advise when you don't know shit.

Necessary? \ No.

It's done all the time (without priming) & most people wouldn't see the difference.
The bands & mud will soak up the texture faster than unprimed dywall. In most cases you'll never notice.
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get over yourself. i did...
randy
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Yes, the wallboard needs to be primed before painting. You can choose to to it before or after the splattering step.
If you do it before the splattering you'll have a uniform white surface and it may help you get a more consistent splatter pattern.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ernesto) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com keyed out...

Of course you should prime before putting up texture. The primer is there to create a foundation for the finish coats and its job is to penetrate into the dust, the paper and the joint compound and make a nice uniformly sealed surface for the finish. Texture materials, due to their high pigment loadings, don't have resin to spare. So, if the resin in the texture is sucked out of the texture coating into a dry, porous unprimed surface you will wind up with weak texture and possibly a weak interface that will be easy to damage. The idea of a primer is to keep the resin in the texture material so it can do its job as it was formulated.
Make sure that they use a texture material and not just joint compound spattered on the walls. Standard JC has absolutely no strength and is basically just dust.
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wrote:

Take a piece of half inch wallboard & break it over your knee. Then try the same with a piece that has been taped & mudded. You'll find this to be way wrong.
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snipped-for-privacy@inyourface.com keyed out...

Take a penny and lightly scrape drying type joint compound (not setting type) and scrape along bare joint compound - big gouge & lots of dust
Take a penny and lightly scrape setting type joint compound (not drying type) and scrape along bare joint compound - less gouge & less dust
Take a penny and lightly scrape it over properly primed joint compound - less gouge & hopefully no dust.
Take a penny and lightly scrape it over a texturing material such as Coronado's Tough Tex - NO SCRATCH
Joint compound alone doesn't add strength to a surface and spritzed joint compound just adds a layer of absorbent dust that will suck the resins out of paints and will fail any tape test you try - every time. I will go so far to say that there are likely dozens of different joint compounds available and a homeowner must rely upon the contractor to use a good and proper material. BTW, the tape adds laminar strength to your experiment. However, we are talking about the cohesive qualities of joint compound and the ability of a coating to adhere to a particular building material surface not structural compounding.
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wrote:

So therefore what?

Yea it's a harder compound. So what?

Yea it's sealed. So what?

Ok. I'm not arguing that there are better texturing compounds than regular all purpose.

I disagree. Properly primed with PVA & two coats of high quality acrylic paints allowed to CURE will pass the tape test.

I merely responded to this comment.

Which is flatly wrong. Joint compound adds a hell of a lot of strength to a wall.
Anyone who's ever tried the fist test would concur. Ahem
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snipped-for-privacy@inyourface.com keyed out...

I wish you guys lived and worked around here. We regularly have problems with paint peeling from jc. From new construction to refits I get presented with faily large peels and inspection of the rear shows sparkly joint compound dust. I once saw a room that was "rough plastered" with joint compound and it was so weak and friable that paint would peel right off almost as it was drying.
All I'm know is that there is some out there that, imho, is just crap. And a homeowner isn't going to now the difference although a good contractor might and know how to put the stuff on correctly. I never get to see those customers. I get to see a woman in a 11 month old house who is trying to touch up and the builder's paint is rolling up around her roller because it is sitting on a layer of dust. Where did this sparkly white dust come from? Why is it so dusty? How come is the old paint so loose that it comes off in sheets? It isn't the the paint they just bought that is causing their trouble - it's just the means for discovery.
It is good that there are professionals in this group who are willing respond and share both the good and bad. It isn't the good parts one has to be wary of and I figured people pose questions not to create confrontation but to pull knowledge from other's experiences. I don't think all they are looking for reassurances and platitudes. Sometimes a scary story may help them make the jump from the cheap handyman to the professional contractor. And that what we all want - a good job.
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wrote:

Where is that?
We regularly have problems

I don't believe the mud is the problem. It is lack of primer. Or a piss thin coat of paint. A good coat of pva will bond & actually become one with the mud. With the advent of the airless sprayer it _is_ possible to put on half a coat of paint. I've seen satins & semi's put directly on with no primer or even a flat base coat. Satins don't have the adhesive properties as does a flat.

Again it aint the dust. Likely it is a piss thin coat of paint & only one at that. It was sprayed on & not back rolled. Sounds like you are talking about tract homes. Bet you could take a sponge just about anywhere in that house & rub right through the paint to the drywall.
I make my living hanging wallcoverings. Over the years I've had some failures. ALL were due to improper materials applied without regard (or ignorance of) adhesion. Wallcoverings introduce moisture then dry & create a tremendous amount of surface tension as they do.. I guarantee you I know more about about bondage than most experienced painters. In these homes you're talking about, I"ll guarantee you wallcovering failures if not primed. Using the RIGHT primer.
Where did this sparkly

Glad to see you've softened your tone.
But you left this out.
*********************************************************************************

So therefore what?

Yea it's a harder compound. So what?

Yea it's sealed. So what?

Ok. I'm not arguing that there are better texturing compounds than regular all purpose.

I disagree. Properly primed with PVA & two coats of high quality acrylic paints allowed to CURE will pass the tape test.

I merely responded to this comment.

Which is flatly wrong. & that's why I got into this thread.
Joint compound adds a hell of a lot of strength to a wall. **************************************************************************
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Ernesto wrote:

from what i have read in sheet rock books and have seen as a kid in the 50-60's when you would just use a roller on the sheet rock that they, my uncle and his kids never did anything to the sheetrock othere than put the mud on with a roller... it seemed to work OK... and if the contractor tells you this then he ought to know....
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I've been around commercial construction for over 40 years. I have never heard of priming drywall before texture and I have used, seen used, and been told to use regular drying joint compound as texture my entire life. There are reasons to use thermal setting compound, making an ultra hard texture on a regular interior wall would not be one of mine.
Caveats: It may or may not be cheaper to seal prime after texture with PVA primer. It is going to take xxx amount of material to seal raw drywall and compound. The wall does not care whether it is paint or primer. It is going to take xxx amount of material to get a uniform sheen on the varying substrates. This can be done by multiple coats or by knowing how to paint.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ernesto) wrote in

Priming before the texture is useless. The mud used to texture will stick to joint compund/ top coat/ finnishing compound as good as it will stick to the flat primer add to this the fact that you will need to prime after the texture is applied and you'll see there is NO need to prime before the texture.
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To all who have replied: THANKS!
A question to those who favor *not* to prime before texturing: What is a good material for texture? Is regular joint-compound adequate? (That's what my contractor will use, unless I ask him to use something else.)
Thanks again.
-Ernesto
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I'm not a pro painter but have done it quit a bit. Thinned joint compound works sprayed or rolled, but I have found at least for heaver textures that the texture products are harder. The one I have used comes in two gallon pails from SW. I diluted it slightly with a couple cups of water and rolled it own. The texture products usually contain a primer. I have been told you can get the same results by mixing joint compound with latex primer but have never tried it.
Robert R
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com keyed out...

Look at the label of the stuff your contractor is using. Have him read the instructions to you. Have him follow the label instructions.
For more information, USG is one of the biggest makers of these materials and they have a fantastic website full of information pertinent to drywall and finishing. Here is the relevant portion of their handbook - http://www.usg.com/IC/Handbook/hb_10.asp
If you can't get there, this is off the page:
19. Preparation For best results, apply a prime coat of SHEETROCK Brand First Coat after joint compound has set. Allow prime coat to dry before applying texture.
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