Price of Light Bulbs

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I notice in all the stores around me that a 150 watt bulb costs as much as 4 100 watt bulbs. The cost of manufacturing the 150 cannot be that much more than a 100 watt. Must be the cardboard package that makes the difference. Mr. Bell is probably turning in his grave over this consumer rip-off.
Sherwin D.
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Is the 150 a 3-way bulb? Has two filaments. Also lower sales volume.
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Sev wrote:

lower sales volume would directly translate into lower price. However, if this discourages other manufacturers from entering the 150w bulb market, then the price would go back up.
Bulbs currently are way overpriced and hardly last past 6 months where I live.
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"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Keep in mind where most of the cost of obtaining and operating an incandescent lightbulb is - the electricity to operate it!
Suppose you get a 75 watt incandescent costing $1.50 at a convenience store (as opposed to less per 4-pack at Lowes) and designed to last 750 hours and producing 1210 lumens, and a 100 watt one with the filament being operated less aggressively operated so as to produce the same amount of light - at which point it would have life expectancy in the 10,000's of hours. For the sake of argument, suppose the 100 watt lightbulb with same light output as the 750 hour $1.25 lightbulb lasted forever and was given away for free! (As opposed to 100 watt dollar store, Sunbeam and Polaraoid lightbulbs costing $1 per 3-pack, producing less light than a usual 750 hour 75W lightbulb and with rated life expectancy of 1000 or 1100 hours.)
Cost over 750 hours:
75 watt 750 hour lightbulb hypothetical free 100 watt forever-bulb
Lightbulb $1.50 Nothing (13-30 cents if you shop around)
Electricity (at USA-average residential rate 10 cents per KWH) $56.25 $75.00
Bottom line $56.38-$57.75 plus $75.00 labor of replacing bulb
Any idea now why lightbulbs often have filaments run so aggressively hot? A few decades ago there were even congressional hearings into this matter! Any idea now why compact fluorescents are a better deal, even if you have a situation wheree you need 1 wattage up to get the light you want even if they last only half as long as they do under standardized conditions?
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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with a calculation error to correct:
I did find need to correct myself! Go down about a page or two to see figures that I screwed up and my corrections - with life extension of incandescents remaining a losing proposition! 2 lines a page or two down have numbers I need to fix by a factor of 10 - but should one need to stick with incandescents, ones 60 watts or more are most economical with filament design to run aggressively hot to the point of shortening life to the 750-1,000 hour range!

CORRECT FIGURES: $5.62 $7.50

CORRECT TO: $5.75-$7.13 plus $7.50 bulb change labor

- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Good catch, I was about to respond then looked to see if you found the error.
Your point is certainly valid, electricity not bulb cost is the main factor. I have no idea what the operating life time of most ight bulbs in my house is, but it is highly variable.
I have a good idea of the operating hours of my 60 watt desk lamp which is close to 2,000 hours a year. Bulbs burn out somewhat more frequently than once per year. Thus bulb life is probably in the 1500 hour area. Even bathroom lights (four 60 watt bulbs) have to have an average life of well over 750 hours based on burn out replacement and an average on time of 2 hours perday.
I recently installed two led nightlights (cycles through 6 colors) and calculated the annual cost based on the wattage and local power costs. Assuming the light remains on 24 hours a day, the cost would be 32 cents per year. Wonder what the operating life will really be. Fairly long, I hope, since each light was $3.00 (in a pack of 5).
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sherwindu wrote:

Was the inventor of the telephone a prolific light bulb price watcher as well?
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JohnH wrote:

Hmmm, I thought Edison invented the bulb?
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Nope - Edison was the first to make a market viable light bulb and patent it. Edison actually followed several other inventors of light bulbs. Edison's contribution was a longer lasting version, an improvement on what was available at the time. See http://www.enchantedlearning.com/inventors/edison/lightbulb.shtml
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No time right now to look at the url, but Edison invented the carbon filament, from oxidised cotton thread.
Who invented the tungsten filament?
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Nope. that was Sherwin Williams. Edison invented the microscope. Later improved by the Wright brothers.
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On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 22:10:56 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Edison invented the Courtship of Eddie's Father.

See the PBS doc, for info about the problems between Wright and Curtis. Apparently Curtis had connections and it took the Wrights decades to get their fair acknowledgement. Sort of a shame that they named an air force base, Curtis-Wright.
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wrote:

Definitely. Remember the words, "Watson, why is it so dark in here. Can't we afford more light bulbs?"
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Why would Bell turn over in his grave? He didn't invent the lightbulb.
150's cost more because nobody buys them.
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Right you are. Wrong inventor, but the idea is the same. I realize that smaller bulbs are more popular, but that's still no justification for the price differential. By the way, that is a one way bulb. Three ways are just as expensive, but there I can see a difference in technology that might warrent a price increase.
Noozer wrote:

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When I asked at my local grocery one day why it was [much] cheaper to buy 2 32oz mayos than it was to buy one 64oz the manager explained that it is all computerized & the computer calculates how long something sits on the shelf when it determines the markup. 'Look at it like the product is paying rent for shelf space' he said.
The markup is much lower on items that turn over rapidly. [like 1 qt mayo, and 100watt lightbulbs]
In some cases as it goes unchecked it gets rediculous. The 32oz mayo almost got to the same price as the 64 as fewer and fewer prople bought the overpriced 64oz.
Jim
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On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 07:38:48 -0400, Jim wrote:

See my other post.

Mayo lasts a long time.
But I have to ask myself, should I buy a gallon of milk at a time or a half gallon? IIRC, if I drink 80% of the gallon before the milk spoils**, I won't have wasted money, but if I have to throw away the rest, I have wasted milk.
**Normally I can drink a gallon before it spoils, but if my tastes change for a week, for example, I may not.
BTW, milk is good much longer than it smells good in the plastic bottle. When the milk is more than a week old, say, I sniff the bottle and it sometimes smells sour. But if it isn't two weeks old, almost always when I pour myself a glass, it smells and tastes perfect. It must be that there is a light coat of milk on the inside of the bottle or carton, that spoils early, because it is exposed to the air all that time.
Also, on occasion, I've left a bottle out all night. That's not enough to ruin milk these days***, and one still has a day or two to drink what is left in the bottle. My experience is that gallon bottles last longer than half gallons when left out, because it takes longer to warm maybe.
***More consistent refrigeration. Good stores don't leave the milk on the loading dock for hours like used to be the case a lot, and still is some places. They get it out of the refrigerated truck and into their own refrigerator before it warms up, and there is probably better care at the dairy too. Milk can last 3 weeks in your refrigerator. Time before the bottle is opened counts as half, sort of like spaghetti sauce. Spaghetti sauce lasts in the jar much longer if one opens the lid and quickly pours out the sauce, before many mold spores can fall into the jar.

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sherwindu wrote:

Why not buy a 150watt output screw in florescent and forget about buying another bulb for this lamp for up to 10 years? It takes MUCH less power to operate, generates MUCH less heat, and only costs less than twice the price of the 150W bulb (seeing them now for under $10 including those that rival incandescent lamps for pleasant color - 5000 Kelvin color temp) Lifetimes on compact florescent bulbs are ranging, depending on brand from 7,000 operating hours to as much as 15,000 operating hours
BTW compact screw ins are available up to 150W input, 650W light output. The closer the bulb gets to 6500 Kelvin color temp, the happier you will be with this long term. 6500 Kelvin is very very close to pure, stark white (overhead sun on cloudless, pollution free day)
Local stores carry a good selection, but for the broadest range of choices, do a Google search for light bulbs. I picked www.1000bulbs.com to do my research. They are located in Mesquite Texas, so pretty central to most areas of the USA. 60W equivalent bulbs are available there for just over $2 each.
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Caution about flourescent bulbs. Most fluorescent bulbs are not dimmable. (Most of the light switches in my house are dimmers.) Even the ones that are dimmable often make a very annoying buzz when they are turned down low. I suggest you try a single bulb before committing to filling your house with them.
I haven't checked prices here (in Calif.) but I once was buying something at Sears that was priced incorrectly (too low). They gave me the low price because it was their mistake. Check that the 150watt pricing wasn't a clerical error. If it isn't - it may be priced high to dissuade people from using the more inefficient bulbs.
Robert Gammon Wrote: > sherwindu wrote:

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madelca100

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madelca100 wrote:

Hi, One reason I mix different kind bulbs/lamps depending on where they are.
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