price of AAA alkaline

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Switch to Eneloop AAA batteries. They cost more up front, but in the long run you'll save a lot of money (and avoid throwing away so many batteries).
You can buy the Panasonic BK-4MCCA8BA Eneloop 8-pack on Amazon for about $16. That works out to about $2 per battery.
The package claims you can recharge them up to 2100 times. I have a hard time believing that figure, but even if you recharge them just 100 times, that brings the per battery cost down to just 2 cents per battery.
Yes, you'll need to buy the additional charger, but that's a small investment for long term savings.
I've been using the Eneloops for a few years now. Unlike the old Nimh or Nicad rechargeables, I can charge these up ahead of time and have batteries ready to use when I need them. I have about a dozen AA and a dozen AAA, with about half of those in various devices around the house (remote controls, clocks, etc.).
I wish they made C and D cell eneloops (not just those little plastic adapter tubes) for longer life in lanterns and whatnot, but I have very few devices that use those battery sizes anymore. It would also be nice if they made 9V eneloops for smoke detectors.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Per HerHusband:

How is shelf life?
e.g. Would you be comfortable putting them in a flashlight that would not be used for a year or so and then be expected to have a reasonable burn time when used?
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Wednesday, June 1, 2016 at 10:50:03 AM UTC-4, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Amazon page says "Maintain up to 70% of their charge after 10 years (when not it use)"
I'll let you verify that claim for us. ;-)
https://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-BK-4MCCA8BA-Pre-Charged-Rechargeable-Batteries/dp/B00JHKSMIG?ie=UTF8
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On 6/1/2016 7:49 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

In general, NiMH cells (i.e., Eneloop) have a higher self-discharge rate than, for example, alkalines.
However, the Eneloops have been optimized for low self-discharge. Their open-circuit voltage quickly falls but remains relatively flat. Total capacity after ~6 months "on the shelf" falls by ~20%.

If you wanted it to be usable a year (or five) down the road, go for good alkalines. Note that the NiMH chemistry yields a 1.2V cell voltage whereas the Alkalines will be 1.5V. (This is more pronounced when the NiMH's sit unused vs. "right off the charger") So, a two-cell flashlight is already half a volt "low" with NiMH's.
[Note that you also need a flashlight with a mechanical power switch so the "switch" isn't stealing power waiting for you to use it]
I keep "crank lights" in my BoB as its not the sort of thing I remember to check up on regularly (and I *need* the lights to work, there).
However, even the crank lights rely on (rechargeable) batteries internally. So, I've been planning on modifying one of my "wind up" (different from "crank") radios to act as a power source for the flashlights (though bulky).
Also, trying to find a convenient way to package a larger "generator" for bigger loads (~10-20W)
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On Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:14:55 -0700, Don Y

IIUC, that's really bad with incandescent flashlights. Maybe not so bad with LEDs?
Someone claims: "While rechargeable batteries are ideal for many applications, the classic "alkaline" battery is still a superior solution for devices that do not have a high current draw, that are usually off, or that need to provide full power for longer periods of time, such as remote controls, flashlights, and electronic toys. "

They have those?

Basement Office Bar?

I've trained a monkey to crank a medium-sized generator so I have the monkey carrry the generator with me. (monkeys are strong and have a lot of endurance.)
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On 6/1/2016 2:32 PM, Micky wrote:

Bug Out Bag.
Does the monkey maintain charge after ten years in a zip up carry bag?
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Ahh... That makes more sense. For some reason I kept thinking "Battery Operated Boyfriend" everytime I read that. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 6/1/2016 11:14 AM, Don Y wrote:

I do have one or two of those crank lights. Styled a lot like the old Star Trek palm phasers. I suspect the internal batteries are button size NiCd cells. I'd like some day to drill a hole through the case. Unsolder the NiCd, and wire to an external three AA cell battery holder. Then, I can use loose NiMH or NiCd cells, AA size. Fun some day project.
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On 6/1/2016 10:49 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I've heard that Energizer Lithium AA cells are very long shelf life.
My own experience is that I've had leakers in nearly every brand. Energizer, Duracell, Rayovac, Harbor Freight. All in the last few years.
Just guessing, Eneloops aren't that long life. Yet.
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I don't know if they would last a year, but I haven't noticed any significant decline in storage. I charge them up when they go dead, then they sit in my desk drawer for several months before I use them again.
If your flashlight is a low power LED type, I would think the eneloops would still have enough power to run the light for a while.
A rechargeable "emergency light" might be a better option. They plug into a wall socket so they're always fully charged when the lights go out.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 6/1/2016 11:38 PM, HerHusband wrote:

I have three of them. They are a night light until the power goes out when they light on full power. Nice to have when the lights go out so I can get to the battery LED lanterns.
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On 6/1/2016 8:38 PM, HerHusband wrote:

We had several of these and they ended up just cooking their (NiCd) batteries. It's possible to put a *smart* charger in such a device but too much price pressure tends to result in stupid chargers that don't know how to float a battery for the long haul.
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I purchased four of the emergency lights several years ago. One died completely after a couple years. A second one seems to have stopped charging (never shows the green charged light anymore), but it still lights up when the power goes out. The other two still work fine.
Still, they weren't that expensive and are handy to have when the power goes out. Beats fumbling in the dark to find flashlights and candles.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 6/2/2016 8:37 PM, HerHusband wrote:

We just have a fair number of lights in places that are easily accessed. E.g., there's a crank light or one of those dinky HF LED lights on each end table, I have a pair of the HF lights hanging under my work table (mainly so I can view the kit located underneath), another of the HF "floodlights" clipped (magnetic) to the underside of the network switch fastened to the underside of one of my work benches, 3D maglites clipped to the walls by the main doorways, another HF light hanging by the entrance to the garage (so I can see under the car or under the hood without having to go fetch a flashlight), etc.
As outages are a rare event, here, the lights see more use in daylight (to see into normally darkened areas).
The cylindrical HF lights looked to be ideal candidates to retrofit 18670 Li batteries. But, they seem to be too large to fit in the place of the 3 AAA's.
(there's probably another Li cell that WOULD fit but the 18670's are just so damn common and relatively easy to "rescue")
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On 6/3/2016 2:11 AM, Don Y wrote:

The HF lights are unregulated. with AAA cells, there is a limit how much current the cells can deliver. Lithium may over current, and blow the bulbs.
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On Friday, June 3, 2016 at 5:25:04 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

You have no concept of Ohm's Law...possibly *you* should be on Lithium?
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On Fri, 3 Jun 2016 06:26:03 -0700 (PDT), bob_villain

Stormy's not as smart has he likes to let on some times - Like we often say in business - just smart enough to be dangerous
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On 6/3/2016 8:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

gone before us....

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLyVQcJUBm66NojjtzLgm_VpaO1nzXTkf_

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On 06/03/2016 05:25 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

More specifically, LEDs need to be current limited, usually with a series resistor. In some cases (like the HF lights) this is accomplished using the internal resistance of the battery. I've seen the same with the little coin-cell keychain lights (the battery is stuck between the LED leads, the switch is a little bit of plastic that holds one of the leads away from th battery).
The LED itself regulates voltage. That's what a diode does.
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Mark Lloyd
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On 6/3/2016 1:40 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diode
Simple Definition of diode
: an electronic device that allows an electric current to flow in one direction only
Source: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
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