Preventing air leaking around garage door...

We have a wood panel overhead garage door that is letting in a lot of cold air.
There is enough front-back give in the tracks that the garage door is not held tightly against the frame -- so much so that you can see daylight coming through.
I can manually and temporarily reduce the air leakage by pushing the door back against the tracks.
What is the best way to fix this?
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just this purpose) that will significantly reduce air infiltration.
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There is a wood trim that has a built in rubber strip thats easy to install. Most garage door retailers sell this trim It may be available at the local lumber yard.
Tom
wrote:

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Otherwise, pressure keeps building till finally the garage explodes....so better fix that other port while he's at it then....
But I wasn't fishin for Ed's--catch and release is all.
--
SVL





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Actually Mr. Precision, both are happening. In the case of a large air gap, the outside wind will easily infiltrate. This will, of course, force air to leave by another port.
You can have heat loss through radiation and have no air exchange. You cannot have air infiltration and now have air escaping in equal volume.
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Thanks.
Now before I go off and buy/install the new trim, is there any rule of thumb of what the appropriate "give" should be in an overhead door track system. If that is part of the problem, then I would want to fix it first and get the maximum natural tightness before adding the final rubber stripping.
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Hiya Jeff.....

Probly no big deal........why (pray tell) are you heating your dammned garage ???

So the door opens smoothly, we can then ASSume ???

Eventually, you should probably seek more gainfull employment, I doubt it is a worthwhile investment of time as opposed to your regular job....

Exactly what is broken ???
--
SVL



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Many of us heat our garages at times. Mine is used for my wood shop. In my case, it is onl heated when I'm working out there.

There is an air gap that has to be sealed from what was stated. There are weatherstrippings that will seal it pretty well.
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Okay...I need to be straight up........it's always the best policy.......
...SO...
Here's a glimpse of a clew for Jeffy--hopefully he might think outa his box for ONCE in his lifetime...
I doubt it--but here goes...and it's in all sincerity.....though he will likely see it differently....
Jeff,
What you are feeling here is "hot air escaping"--its _NOT _"cold air getting in".......
Try thinking outside of your own little box just for once, my friend....perhaps even do a cursory study of thermodynamics if it's something that interests you.....
Or just go ahead and seal the damned door if you are concerned with heat loss through it.
HTH
--
SVL



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