prevent electrical plug from wobbling loose?

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On 10/3/2012 8:56 AM, Robert Green wrote:

I doubt you have rewired as many hair salons as I have or repaired any commercial hair dryers. ^_^
TDD
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I fixed a wire on a pizza oven, one time.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I doubt you have rewired as many hair salons as I have or repaired any commercial hair dryers. ^_^
TDD
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wrote in message

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Is that all you've got? What does that have to do with *anything* here except perhaps your ego? You suggested an expensive solution without knowing nearly enough details to make that decision
I will explain again, because it doesn't seem you understood.
The problem with "replace all outlets immediately" solution, as DerbyDad noted, is that no one ran any tests to confirm that the outlet was defective in any way. We just don't know.
I based my comments on the increasing number of plugs I see coming from overseas that have flat, undimpled blades that ANY outlet has a hard time holding. If there was truly an outlet problem, we might have been told that everyone has this problem. But it seems limited to the clippers this one hairdryer uses.
Even *you* probably wouldn't rewire a salon on the say-so of hairdresser/employee. In suggesting a rewire you pretty much failed to consider an employee isn't in a position to make that decision. Even worse, her suggestion that her boss had the place originally wired with bad outlets could blowback very badly on her. Not many bosses like that kind of technical advice - from a hairdresser.
What if he did the suggested rewire and it turns out that the same (perhaps defective) plug fell out of the new outlets? Would you charge him for all the work that you did that he didn't need doing? Is *that* really a good solution to this problem?
As DerbyDad suggested, a little investigation is in order before anyone declares an expensive rewire is necessary because one hairdresser's clippers don't stay firmly in. A $1.42 outlet extender *designed* to clamp down on the plug blades is a pretty cheap solution that worked for me in a similar situation. My barber uses 6 outlet power strips to accommodate all the various clippers he uses. I doubt his aesthetics would be horrifically compromised by the use of a 3 way outlet extender despite opinions to the contrary.
-- Bobby G.
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On 10/4/2012 3:07 AM, Robert Green wrote:

I'm glad you're such an expert on all things electrical. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/4/2012 4:07 AM, Robert Green wrote:

WTF? It would take me less time to replace an outlet (as a test) than has been spent agonizing over the solution to this problem.
Sheeeeeeeesh!
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On 10/4/2012 4:22 AM, me wrote:

He doesn't understand the KISS principle when applied to electrical problems. A two dollar outlet will last a few years longer than a one dollar outlet and a five dollar outlet will last even longer but a thirty dollar outlet will last forever. Be careful, Bobby will bury you beneath a pile of pseudo-intellectual codswallop. He would still be over analyzing the situation while the building burned down around him. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/4/2012 5:39 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

ROFLMAO!
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Unless the hair dressers are violent and epileptic, what other likely problem would there be?
The OP said bending the prongs on the cord helped. That's one clue. Though, one might not be enough for you.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 10/4/2012 4:07 AM, Robert Green wrote:

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One clue about what?
If I have a defective plug and I bend the prongs it will stay in a good receptacle.
If I have a defective receptacle and I bend the prongs on a good plug it will stay in the defective receptacle.
What have I learned? I've learned that bending the prongs on a plug will help it stay in a receptacle regardless of whether the plug or the receptacle is defective.
What haven't I learned? I haven't learned which one was defective.
Unless other plugs fall out of the same receptacle or unless that plug falls out of other receptacles, no one knows which is at fault. A few simple steps would determine that. Steps that would be easier to do than replacing either part as a guess.
We used to call swapping parts without knowing what was really wrong "shot gun troubleshooting".
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In article

Yep, just was talking about that today at work. Had a problem with a gadget, didn't know how to go about troubleshooting it. One guy suggested swapping this part, that part, and the other part. So I gave 'em the shotgunning spiel.
Of course, with consumer electronics, and most industrial electronics, there is no troubleshooting anymore. Bad solder joint on a $500 board, you just bought a new board.
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Well, one could add some solder to that plug so it's nice and tight. I'm sure that's legal !!! Or wrap aluminum foil. !!!
Been retired for 1 1/2 years, but working I worked on plenty of stuff, luckily I had no dealings with lead free boards. I fixed boards, I designed boards. I was building some boards for implants, with transmitters. These darn little capacitors were about 1.5 mm long. I had to use a microscope, and if I hit it wrong with a point, it would flip somewhere, and try to find that !!
Greg
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In article

1.5 mm long? That sounds like one of those giant 0603 guys. My lead assembler can solder those with one eye tied behind his back. No microscope needed until he gets down to 0201. (But he ain't old like us.)
Trouble with my gadget is I'm building a $100 board and cramming it in a $100 enclosure with $100 worth of other misc stuff, but then hooking it all up to a sealed $3000 off-the-shelf contraption that's about a cubic inch of magic black box. Now, how long do I stare at my end of the deal before I chisel out the black box and try to blame the guy who made that? And I'm just the dumb ass putting it all together, so I barely know what's going on in there to begin with. Shotgunning sucks, but sometimes it's the only damn way to fix it.
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On 10/4/2012 11:34 PM, Smitty Two wrote:

Sounds like you're having problem on a quantum level where the atoms in the substrate are migrating across boundaries and shorting things out or it could be a classic case of a malfunctioning framistan. ^_^
TDD
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Increase the capacitance, until it hertz? That's frequently the answer, though usually met with resistance. Here's your sine! (Chris waves.....)
Did Bob ever go to the hair dresser place, and replace that socket?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Sounds like you're having problem on a quantum level where the atoms in the substrate are migrating across boundaries and shorting things out or it could be a classic case of a malfunctioning framistan. ^_^
TDD
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I do 0603s and 0402s regularly but, thankfully, we don't use 0201s. Yet. Some are pushing for it but manufacturing has been stiff-arming, so far.

It's usually the most effective way. Feedback makes some troubleshooting next to impossible.
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-

John nailed it. When you have poor plug retention, the first thing you try is a better receptacle. A new spec grade receptacle will hold any NEMA 5-15 or 1-15 plug tightly. Done and done.
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Derby Dad is named John? I didn't know that.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
-

John nailed it. When you have poor plug retention, the first thing you try is a better receptacle. A new spec grade receptacle will hold any NEMA 5-15 or 1-15 plug tightly. Done and done.
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Ok, while you are running out to the store to get that spec grade receptacle, I'll try my plug in the receptacle on the other side of the room. Before you've made it to your car, I'll know whether the receptacle or the plug was the cause of the problem.
Did you happen to notice that the problem is happening to a hairdresser in a salon. Do you think they have a drawer full of spec grade receptacles lying around? Do you think that they have even one spec grade receptacle lying around?
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On 10/4/2012 9:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

K.I.S.S. ^_^
TDD
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I'd say the first thing you do if you're a cosmetologist and not an electrician is to look at the plug to see if it's poorly made. It's not only outlets that are made on the cheap these days. I've been looking at plugs tonight and some have thinner or shorter or narrow blades than others.
The solution has to fit the facts: the person reporting the problem is not the owner or the manager, so yanking that outlet is going to be somewhat more troublesome than "done and done." You surely wouldn't suggest she grab a screwdriver and pull the questionable outlet herself in a commercial establishment she doesn't own or manage?
She first has to convince the owner that some guy named The Daring Dufas (who bills himself as a Veteran of the International Fart Wars) said the shop needs all new outlets. That's going to be a hard sell, I think. Dufe's judgment was made without ever having set foot in the shop and without asking several pertinent questions as in "does the plug wiggle out of ALL the outlets?" How much tugging does it take for it to become unplugged, etc? What kind of outlets are installed now? Are these clippers the only device that exhibits the problem?
While I agree that using cut rate (especially back stab) outlets is false economy, we were given some pretty specific details that tend to rule out a rewire - at least until we know more. If she can make do with a 2 dollar extension cord or outlet extender with childproof shutters, that's the best solution. If that doesn't work, a longer cord with a better plug, perhaps a grounded one for extra resistance to pulling out would be the next step I'd suggest she takes.
With all that said, if the outlet is truly arcing and not just sparking because the plug is already partially pulled out, then as DD noted, the employee has a duty to report the problem. That could be a valid path to a rewiring job. It should at least get the owner to inspect the outlet more closely for signs of trouble. As her friend noted, she's not likely to ask the boss to rewire the outlet so that puts real limits on her potential solutions.
-- Bobby G.
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