Pressure washer oil leak?


I have a 5HP sears pressure washer with briggs and stratton engine that is leaking oil. This engine has no oil filter or oil drain plug. To change oil I tilt it on its side to drain the oil out and put new oil back in that filer hole, so it's not like there's a loose plug or filter. Furthermore I can't really tell where the oil is leaking from. There is oil all around the engine and it leaks very slowly -- a few drops per day.
I wonder if this is a blown head gasket. If it is, how hard it is to repair it myself, or how much would it cost to have it repaired?
I see several options: -try to replace the gasket -put new and thick oil in before each use (twice each year). Previously I use synthetic 10w40 left over from car oil change. -buy a new washer
Any advice?
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First, use the cleaner to wash the engine, if it will stay running. Let it get up to operating temperature, then shut it down and dry entire engine with rags. Wait a few days and carefully look for leak.
Why do you use old oil? If it's too dirty for your car, it's certainly no good for your B/S engine.
nb
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notbob wrote:

Probably from the crankshaft bearing seal where the pump is connected and it's not visible. Unlikely to be a head gasket.

Where do you get the idea he used old oil? He said he used 10w40 synthetic leftover from a car oil change i.e. used 4.5 qts in car, had .5qt leftover for the pressure washer engine.
As for the oil itself, I use M1 5w30 synthetic in all my gas engines from the truck to the lawn mower and have no issues.
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geezer moment
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geezer moment
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notbob wrote:

I have those myself from time to time. It sucks being old and decrepit...
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You use old car oil, thats a good one. You put crapped up, worn out oil, in a motor that only probably has a 3-500 hour life with good new oil. Since its real life span is so small on the B&S it really need new oil, as it doesnt even have a filter. How many miles were on the car oil, and was that city driving?
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I doubt the engine would even run with a blown head gasket on a B&S engine.
Tighten the head bolts, if anything..
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On the side of the motor is the crank case breather. Typically rectangular, and holds on with two bolts (probably need 5/16 nut setter to get the small bolts out). The breather sometimes has a tube that goes to the carb.
What happens, is that when the piston goes down, it creates a tiny bit of pressure in the crankcase. So, they put a breather (one way valve) on. So air can go out, but not in. The crankcase runs at a very slight negative pressure.
These sometimes get clogged, and then the pressure from the piston forces oil out. When you take the crankcase breather off, it will expose the valve springs and ends of the valve rods. These can sometimes be cleaned by soaking in kerosene, or similar solvent.
There is a crankcase gasket which can be leaking. I've never paid to have one replaced. Is it enough oil to mess up the customer's driveway, or some other problem?
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I have an oil leak same as first poster, a very slow lead. I found it was coming from one of the screws securing the pump to the motor
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