Pressure Washer Hose Repair

I have a relatively cheap (<$150) Karcher electric pressure washer. Last time I used it, somehow the threads on teh plastic nut that holds the high-pressure hose onto the machine itself got stripped out (insert curses to Karcher for using a plastic nut on such a high-impact part...)
Anyway, it seems that a replacement hose is $55, which seems like a bit too much to invest in a 5-year old washer of its price range.
On the other hand, it's only the nut that's bad, not the hose. It actually seems like a huge waste to replace the entire hose just for the nut. If this were a garden hose, you'd cut it and put a new end on it.
So finally my question: Is it practical to have a high-pressure hose repaired? I'd need to have someone cut the hose, replace the nut (which seems to be a standard size), and put a new end on it (not sure if its standard, but it probably is). What type of place would do this kind of work? Would places that make custom hydrolic hoses be of any help?
Just hoping to see how reasonable this is before I go calling around and make a fool of myself, lol.
-Tim
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Alot of forklift dealers make there own hoses, check in the yellow pages for a company that sells hydraulic fittings, here where I live there's a company Precision Industries there nation wide, if there in your area they may be able to help. What your looking for is what they call a re-useable fitting.
Tom

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Check around and look for a full-service auto parts store that makes custom hydraulic lines. They will cut back a few inches, and install a new fitting for a few bucks.
Tim Fischer wrote:

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Hydraulic hose and high pressure hose used on pressure washers can have the same ID but will have a different OD. The fittings for a hydraulic hose won't crimp correctly on the pressure washer hose.
Brian
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But check what they're using for parts! The idiots in town here were trying to sell me air hose parts, and even "guaranteed" me they'd work "perfectly". Even when I told him this is for a 3,000 psi pressure washer and then pointed out the "300 psi max" on the package, the idiot still said "sure, it'll work just fine". I asked to see the manager. He WAS the manager! So much for going to the NAPA store again. There's a good competitor 2 blocks away.
HTH, PopS
: Check around and look for a full-service auto parts store that makes : custom hydraulic lines. They will cut back a few inches, and install a : new fitting for a few bucks. : : : Tim Fischer wrote: : > I have a relatively cheap (<$150) Karcher electric pressure washer. Last : > time I used it, somehow the threads on teh plastic nut that holds the : > high-pressure hose onto the machine itself got stripped out (insert curses : > to Karcher for using a plastic nut on such a high-impact part...) : > : > Anyway, it seems that a replacement hose is $55, which seems like a bit too : > much to invest in a 5-year old washer of its price range. : > : > On the other hand, it's only the nut that's bad, not the hose. It actually : > seems like a huge waste to replace the entire hose just for the nut. If : > this were a garden hose, you'd cut it and put a new end on it. : > : > So finally my question: Is it practical to have a high-pressure hose : > repaired? I'd need to have someone cut the hose, replace the nut (which : > seems to be a standard size), and put a new end on it (not sure if its : > standard, but it probably is). What type of place would do this kind of : > work? Would places that make custom hydrolic hoses be of any help? : > : > Just hoping to see how reasonable this is before I go calling around and : > make a fool of myself, lol. : > : > -Tim : > : >
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They use hose rated at 3000 psi on a pressure washer?
Pop wrote:

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Yes they do, but I used the 3,000 because that's what the present hoses are rated for: The machine claims 2,600 psi at full factory throttle. The hoses aren't regular hoses though; they're rubber of some kind, but also have steel bands & strands in side them. One of the extension hoses I bought has a braided steel outer cover, sort of a chinese finger-trap looking weave. I've never cut one so I'm not sure exactly how they're made. The hoses are pretty stiff and hard to coil for storage; and take awhile to get the "coil" out of them when you start using them. 2,250, 2,450 and 2,600 seem to be the most common ratings I've noticed in this area. VeVilbis is somehow always in the picture too as having made some part of other. There are more powerful ones but they're a lot more expensive, and take more expertise to use. They can be dangerous, so it's well worth reading the manuals before purchasing one.
PopS
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: > : Check around and look for a full-service auto parts store that : > makes : > : custom hydraulic lines. They will cut back a few inches, and : > install a : > : new fitting for a few bucks. : > : : > : : > : Tim Fischer wrote: : > : > I have a relatively cheap (<$150) Karcher electric pressure : > washer. Last : > : > time I used it, somehow the threads on teh plastic nut that : > holds the : > : > high-pressure hose onto the machine itself got stripped out : > (insert curses : > : > to Karcher for using a plastic nut on such a high-impact : > part...) : > : > : > : > Anyway, it seems that a replacement hose is $55, which seems : > like a bit too : > : > much to invest in a 5-year old washer of its price range. : > : > : > : > On the other hand, it's only the nut that's bad, not the : > hose. It actually : > : > seems like a huge waste to replace the entire hose just for : > the nut. If : > : > this were a garden hose, you'd cut it and put a new end on : > it. : > : > : > : > So finally my question: Is it practical to have a : > high-pressure hose : > : > repaired? I'd need to have someone cut the hose, replace the : > nut (which : > : > seems to be a standard size), and put a new end on it (not : > sure if its : > : > standard, but it probably is). What type of place would do : > this kind of : > : > work? Would places that make custom hydrolic hoses be of any : > help? : > : > : > : > Just hoping to see how reasonable this is before I go calling : > around and : > : > make a fool of myself, lol. : > : > : > : > -Tim : > : > : > : > : > : >
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Unless you can find a place familiar with DeVillbuis(sp?) and such I don't think you'll be able to get a legit repair. Make certain it's a place that services pressure washers. Make sure the place knows what they're doing and how to handle any repair or you could get a surprise while you're using your washer. A broken hose tends to flail around with great gusto.
HTH, PopS
:I have a relatively cheap (<$150) Karcher electric pressure washer. Last : time I used it, somehow the threads on teh plastic nut that holds the : high-pressure hose onto the machine itself got stripped out (insert curses : to Karcher for using a plastic nut on such a high-impact part...) : : Anyway, it seems that a replacement hose is $55, which seems like a bit too : much to invest in a 5-year old washer of its price range. : : On the other hand, it's only the nut that's bad, not the hose. It actually : seems like a huge waste to replace the entire hose just for the nut. If : this were a garden hose, you'd cut it and put a new end on it. : : So finally my question: Is it practical to have a high-pressure hose : repaired? I'd need to have someone cut the hose, replace the nut (which : seems to be a standard size), and put a new end on it (not sure if its : standard, but it probably is). What type of place would do this kind of : work? Would places that make custom hydrolic hoses be of any help? : : Just hoping to see how reasonable this is before I go calling around and : make a fool of myself, lol. : : -Tim : :
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A new hose or hose/wand combo can be purchased on EBAY for a lot less than $55. Several dealers sell them. One of the better sellers has Midwest in their name. I can look up the actual name if you are really interested as I bought from them.
--
Colbyt
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Unfortunately, it doesn't take a standard hose -- you have to take the gun apart to get the other end of the hose apart, and it has a non-standard fitting.. There's a dealer on eBay from the UK that can sell me one, but it was going to be almost as expensive, not including the shipping from the UK which made it worse.
Every once in awhile, a used part will appear on eBay, but they seem to go for almost as high and are rare enough to be hard to attain...
But if you think you know of a dealer that can sell me a part cheaper, I'd be interested.
-Tim
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than
as
it
UK
Tim,
The Paypal ID was Midwestspray. The contact phone # was 402-935-7733.
They offered a large variety of parts both on and off EBAY.
At one time I am fairly sure they had what you need.
Let me know if this works out for you.
Colbyt
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