pressure testing a house gas line ?

I am going to add a short run from my main inside gas line to service a new cooktop. It will only be about a 10 ft run...the service line is in the ceiling a little over from the range location. Question is...do you normally test the new line from the meter to the rest of the system...and what is the normal pressure in an inside gas line (black pipe throughout)...looks linke am 1" or 1 1/4" run ?
I used to work for the gas company in Chicago a long time ago when I was out of school for awhile...we laid...welded...and tested hundreds of 2" lines in the time I was there. I would rather pressure test than use the old soapy bubble test.
Any additional help/guidance will be appreciated.
TR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim wrote:

normal gas line pressure is only a couple psi.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But the normal test by code is much higher. The uniform plumbing code is 10 psi for 15 minutes, IIRC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Your starting to see a 24 Hour craft test on gas lines and of coarse the inspector puts his lock on the craft box. . This is in commercial work , but I'm sure it will gravitate into housing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If that!
Gas pressure is usually measured in "Inches of Water."
30' of water is about 15 psi. 1 psi is about 2' or 24" of water.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Gilmer wrote:

Hi, Are you sure 1 psi = 2 feet of water column?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

Close enuf. http://www.iprocessmart.com/techsmart/pressure_help.htm
An easy way to remember it is: "half a pound per foot..."
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always start with the "fact" that one atmosphere of pressure is aboutg 30' of water and about 15 psi. Folks can substitute 31.? and 14.7 but our approximation is definitely "gud enuf."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

around here, its ONE HALF PSI
Test pressure on the gauge was 15# IIRC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim wrote:

Blow up a balloon. Put it on the pipe. Does the balloon shrink?
The pressure from the balloon will be greater than anything the pipe will ever see.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

gas line pressure a few ounces max.
avoid ever pressure testing old lines, as it tends to cause leaks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd love to see a building inspector face looking at that. You know your talking about a gas line in a house , a leaky gas line can cause an explosion ( happens all the time ) They have proper test for a reason I don't think a balloon in the end of a pipe is very good advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sac Dave wrote:

I didn't suggest the balloon for the benefit of the building inspector; I suggested it for the homeowner.
If you think it's an unacceptable, goofey, idea (and I agree on the goofey part), what is your suggestion for a 1-2oz pressure test?
Didn't think so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Possibly you don't understand the idea of a pressure test. You test a gas line using a pressure much higher than the service pressure but still well within the pressure rating of the components to force marginal joints to reveal themselves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

About 15 years ago they replaced my gas meter. When I got home from work there was a note on my door for me to call and somebody would come out and turn the gas back on. When the tech got there he tested the line first. He hooked a manometer to the line. Then he blew into a tube he hooked up to it. When the manometer dropped back down he started looking for the leak. The leak turned out to be in the meter itself. But the test was not some huge super-dooper thing. Just as much pressure as he could get into the line with one breath.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

Okay, I'll play. What do you suggest for 1-2 lb pressure test? A tire gauge?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yes, a 10 psi tire guage would work. But the proper test is at 10psi.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the suggestion is 10 psi for 15 minutes just like stated before. very simple with a shrader valve, a pressure guage, some reducing bushings and a 't'. and a simple manual tire pump can supply the pressure. so using the excuse of not having a compressor is not valid either.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The right way would be to buy a test gauge Pump the whole system up with a bike pump only needs 10 psi for a couple hours. Put the gauge were the new cook top will be. You will most likely have to shut of all the valves to any gas fired equipment ( water heater Furnace ect.) You might be able to start the additional line with a valve Make sure the valve has WOG on it ( water oil gas ) then just shut that off test the additional pipe. It's always best to soap all the joints as an extra precaution I always use about 5 wraps of Teflon tape on the treads then use rectorseal ( pipe dope ) Just to be safe you might leave the gauge on the line until your ready to hook up the new cook top that's the advantage of an in line valve . (Amazon.com product link shortened)HNR4I8RXLVW&tag=nextag-tools-tier4-20&linkCode=asn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't believe that, after around 15 responses, nobody has a clue on this. Pressure to an appliance, in the US, is about 10 inches on a water column. 1 psi is equal to 27.71 inches on a water column (at sea level).
The other posters are right though, it makes sense to test at a higher pressure. \\\\
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.