Pressure tank without shutoff valve

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On Monday, August 4, 2014 12:31:28 AM UTC-4, Harry K wrote:

I'd say a checkvalve located at the submersible pump *is* a checkvalve between the tank and well.
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so when the foot valve fails, the entire stack is not drained. And when t he foot valve and the bottom check valve failes, ditto.
Not sure that is what I would do, though.
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as I think about it, I bet that checkvalve was installed between the well and the pressure tank AFTER the foot valve failed. Interestingly, after several years, the foot valve started working again.
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Michael Wilson posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

AS i understand it a larger tank is better because the pump runs longer for each cycle but cycles less, which is what causes pump problems.
--
Tekkie

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That is correct. Usually the most problems will be caused by the motor cycling off and on more. When a motor starts up it draws more current for a short period of time while the motor is starting up. This puts more stress on the motor. If you have a motor like on my well, there is a set of points that puts a capacitor in and out of the circuit for about a second at startup while the motor comes up to speed. The more often the points cycle, the faster they wear out.
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