Pressure tank without shutoff valve

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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 2:13:51 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The plumber said the diaphragm is broken in the tank we have. The pressure switch constantly flips on when water is run in the house. He wants $900.00 to replace it with an Amtrol WX203 32 Gal tank. I'm putting in a Flotec 35 Gallon instead.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 3:19:42 PM UTC-4, Michael Wilson wrote:

If the tank is otherwise OK, I believe on some, if not all of them, you can replace the diaphram/bladder.
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On 8/2/2014 3:26 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Michael Wilson wrote:

tank we have. The pressure switch constantly flips on when water is run in the house. He wants $900.00 to replace it with an Amtrol WX203 32 Gal tank. I'm putting in a Flotec 35 Gallon instead.

not all of them, you

I'd first try to reinflate, and see if the bladder is still there. Might be just a couple minutes with air compressor could get by for the next year or more.
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On 8/2/2014 3:43 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I think originally that there was no bladder in pressure tanks and they just relied on the air space. They added bladders later since the air will eventually dissolve in the water requiring air to be added frequently.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 4:03:07 PM UTC-4, Frank wrote:

Before bladders they had a system that regulated the air to the correct level by allowing the pump to suck some air in during a pump cycle, if the level of air in the tank was too low. Without that, in a period of months, the tank would water log, as you point out.
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On 8/2/2014 4:03 PM, Frank wrote:

The one I saw briefly, had a doodad that looked like a flying saucer with a hose. I think that's designed to inject a small bit of air each time the pump cycles.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 4:28:42 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I know there was more than one type. But I think they all need some feedback/control mechanism to keep the air at the right level. The air is supposed to be from where the gizmo is, up to the top of the tank. If water rises above that, it triggers it to start pumping air. Without feedback, if you just put some in each time, you still wouldn't get it right and you could wind up with a tank full of air, instead of half water.
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On 8/2/2014 6:04 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Who cares? If there's a bit too much air, it comes out the faucet next time. No worries.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 6:31:45 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't think folks would like it so much if air and water was spurting out in fits from their faucets. Which is what would happen if the tank got full of air. And it would continue to do that, as the pump put more in each cycle. That's why they have a regulating system.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 2:43:25 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have been inflating it every few days to keep the pump from running too much. The current tank is welded shut, so no chance of fixing the bladder/diaphragm. In any case, I've already bought the tank. It's on my porch, ready for action.
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On 8/2/2014 5:44 PM, Michael Wilson wrote:

the pump from running too much. The current tank is welded shut, so no chance of fixing the bladder/ diaphragm. In any case, I've already bought the tank. It's on my porch, ready for action.

Ah, that provides a bit more information. Thanks, nice to hear a few more details.
How's your wrench pulling and pipe thread doping skills? Done a bunch of galvanized iron?
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 4:58:43 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Galvanized iron? I'm going to do what this crazy guy does. Looks straightforward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p593FRKTp3w

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On 8/2/2014 6:25 PM, Michael Wilson wrote:

How's your wrench pulling and pipe thread doping skills? Done a bunch of PVC?
I remember from some where, CPVC is used for drinking water, but can't remember why. Hope that works out for you.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 3:38:07 PM UTC-7, Stormin Mormon wrote:





Both PVC and CPVC are rated for drinking water. CPVC must be used for hot water lines as PVC can't take the heat. I did my whole house while remodeling and old shack with CPVC just for the convenience of having only one system.
Harry K
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On 8/2/2014 3:19 PM, Michael Wilson wrote:

tank we have. The pressure switch constantly flips on when water is run in the house. He wants $900.00 to replace it with an Amtrol WX203 32 Gal tank. I'm putting in a Flotec 35 Gallon instead.

Before spending $900, I'd be tempted to do some more research. I'm right on the edge of my wisdom, about well tanks. Is there a tire inflater valve on there some where? Might check that with a tire gage, see if there is pressure. Also press the valve stem, see if water comes out. (If water comes out, I think that indicates bad diaphragm.)
Just for diagnostic, I'd also turn off the well pump breaker, and put an air compressor on the tire valve. Inflate to 30 PSI, See if you can get air to come out the water faucets (sign of leaking diaphragm).
Who knows? Might just be the tank needs reinflating.
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And I've never seen one without it. Every appliance using/supplying water should have one for just such a reason. It recently cost me $120 to have a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forgot to specify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation though. I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.
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I thought we were talking about a valve between the well and the pressure tank.
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 1:01:58 AM UTC-4, Pico Rico wrote:

+1
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 10:01:58 PM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:


we were and I was. Complicated situation. Back when I bought this place it was serviced from a community well that had been drilled by the state when the highway rebuild ruined the spring. Served 4 hourses originally but mi ne and the neighbove 1/4 mile away (who had the well) were the only ones le ft. I somehow wound up being the unpaid 'well fixer' and as time went on I even became the "well fixer upper guy who got to pay the costs".
I drilled myi own well to get off that community well but kept the intercon nection "in case". 'In case' happened twice at the neighbors and they used off my well until theirs was fixed. Then about 2 months ago my well pump started running about every 15 minutes. What with all the irrigation lines I had installed, I was looking at a major digging project to find the leak .
OK. Told the neighbor I would be using off their well. Turned on the inte rconnect and then discovered that there was no shut-ff between the pressur tank and my well. Neighbor would have been pumping right into wherever my l eak was. Had to pay the $120 to a plumber to get a shut-off installed - it would have cost about $10 if I had thought to tell the well drillers to in stall one.
My leak turned out to be in the well, galvanic corrosion ate a big hole jus t above the pump (galvanized to brass connection). It also did the same at the pitless adapter.
I am a firm believer that there should be a shutoff on any line where it en ters the house. Most would never or only very rarely used but when needed. ..
Harry K
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 10:01:58 PM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:

we were and I was. Complicated situation. Back when I bought this place it was serviced from a community well that had been drilled by the state when the highway rebuild ruined the spring. Served 4 hourses originally but mine and the neighbove 1/4 mile away (who had the well) were the only ones left. I somehow wound up being the unpaid 'well fixer' and as time went on I even became the "well fixer upper guy who got to pay the costs".
I drilled myi own well to get off that community well but kept the interconnection "in case". 'In case' happened twice at the neighbors and they used off my well until theirs was fixed. Then about 2 months ago my well pump started running about every 15 minutes. What with all the irrigation lines I had installed, I was looking at a major digging project to find the leak.
OK. Told the neighbor I would be using off their well. Turned on the interconnect and then discovered that there was no shut-ff between the pressur tank and my well. Neighbor would have been pumping right into wherever my leak was.
didn't you have a check valve between the pressure tank and the well?
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 1:14:35 PM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:


No. I know people think one should be there but it is redundant and does nothing but add restrictions to the system. The checkvalve goes in the well, normally just above the pump or it may be part of the pump.
One can be, however, installed between tank and well somewhere if the one in the well fails.
I saw a report somewhere where someone had installed multiple checkvalves in the drop pipe on a very deep well. No explanation of why they thought that was a good idea.
Harry K
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