Pressure tank without shutoff valve

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First call, longtime listener.
I'm changing out the water pressure tank, but I don't have a shut off valve from tank to well to drain the tank. If I turn off the breaker to the well pump, will this effectively shut off the water so I can drain the tank and replace it? Help much appreciated.
Mike
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First call, longtime listener.
I'm changing out the water pressure tank, but I don't have a shut off valve from tank to well to drain the tank. If I turn off the breaker to the well pump, will this effectively shut off the water so I can drain the tank and replace it? Help much appreciated.
_____
yes.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 10:56:52 AM UTC-7, Michael Wilson wrote:

ll pump, will this effectively shut off the water so I can drain the tank a nd replace it? Help much appreciated.

Yes, and while you are chaning it out, you should install that missing shut -off valve.
Harry K
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On 08/02/2014 1:21 PM, Harry K wrote:

the tank and replace it? Help much appreciated.
That's the routine way you would do it, anyway. You don't want the pump kicking on when you empty the tank and lose pressure that it will if leave on unless block the pressure switch which is klunky way to go at it.
Just turn the pump supply breaker off.

Not really -- you _never_ want a deadhead of the well pump that's possible if somebody inadvertently closes that valve.
While there is one here, it's never been closed (and is wired so can't be closed w/o specific effort to remove the wire) since installed in '64. The pressure tank has been replaced several times in that time span.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 12:56:52 PM UTC-5, Michael Wilson wrote:

ll pump, will this effectively shut off the water so I can drain the tank a nd replace it? Help much appreciated.

Many thanks!
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 10:56:52 AM UTC-7, Michael Wilson wrote:

Yes, and while you are chaning it out, you should install that missing shut-off valve.
Harry K
I have never seen a well pump with a valve (other than a check valve) on its outlet to the pressure tank.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 2:47:28 PM UTC-4, Pico Rico wrote:

If you mean you've never seen a shut off valve between the well and the tank, I agree. There normally isn't one and there is no need for one. There typically is a drain valve on the tank and a valve between the tank and the house water system or whatever it's supplying.
All he has to do is shut off the pump and drain the tank.
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On 8/2/2014 3:24 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Years ago, some friends had a well pump in the cellar, with expansion tank. Every now and again, he had to turn off the house water, and let the tank drain. Would made more sense to me to put a tire valve on top of the tank, and pump more air in. There was already a gadget with a diaphragm (not in the tank) and hose that was supposed to "regulate the air" which I think means put in a tiny spot of air every time the pump cycled on and off.
I think the bladder tanks like the OP has, are designed to NOT lose the air charge, and "never needs refilling".
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On 8/2/2014 3:41 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I haven't messed with mine but plumber suggested turning off water to tank, letting water bleed off into house and pressurizing to maybe 25 psi. Think if I noted what appeared to be too rapid cycling, I'd check the pressure.
I have a ball shut off valve beyond the tank and with my whole house filter, there are more ball valves to isolate and bypass the filter making change easy.
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On 8/2/2014 3:56 PM, Frank wrote:

The one I found on the web was factory charged to 38, so 25 PSI sounds reasonable. I'd sure rather inflate to 38 PSI once a year, compared to spending $900. I can get a nice compressor for 9 c'notes and inflate tires to boot.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 3:41:48 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That's how the old system worked. If the tank needed more air, it would put some in by using the pump to suck air during a regular pumping cycle. And as you say, sometimes they went kaput and then the tank would become water logged. That system only works if the pump is by the tank.

Correct, until something goes wrong with them too. I think you can replace the bladder on at least some of them. I raised that as an easier, cheaper possibility.
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On 8/2/2014 4:18 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Would you have to open the tank some how, to get the old bladder out? Might be a bit of work, for sure.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 4:32:08 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

You tube is your friend:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAhWlbbNGN4

That's a big tank, like for a house. On smaller, maybe 10 gallon tanks that I see for irrigation use, I think they have a fitting on top and the bladder probably comes out from there.
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On Saturday, August 2, 2014 11:47:28 AM UTC-7, Pico Rico wrote:

And I've never seen one without it. Every appliance using/supplying water s hould have one for just such a reason. It recently cost me $120 to have a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forgot to sp ecify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation though. I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.
Harry K
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 12:42:29 AM UTC-4, Harry K wrote:

a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forgot to specify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation though . I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.

You're confusing a shutoff valve for the water supply *to the house*, with a shutoff valve between the well and tank. Of course there should always be a shutoff between the tank and the house. But I've never seen one between the well and tank. What purpose exactly does it serve? Assuming it's a submersible, all it does is block the flow of water into the tank which you could just as easily do by shutting off the breaker. If the tank has 60 gallons of water, that water will still be available to run into the house, unless there is a valve between the house and tank.
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 9:00:10 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

e a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forgot t o specify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation thou gh. I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.

Here is why it would be useful to have a shutoff valve between tank and wel l.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiZhN0P_xNg#aid=P-utvCcl8zY

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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 11:57:49 AM UTC-4, Michael Wilson wrote:

ave a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forgot to specify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation th ough. I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.

The valve he shuts off is *not* between the tank and the well. The valve is between the tank and the house water lines. I don't understand all the confusion here. To drain any sediment, all you really need to do is:
A - Shut off the power to the well pump
B - Connect a drain hose
C - Open the drain valve.
D - Partially drain the tank.
E - Turn pump back on, repeat as necessary until it's clear.
He also closed off the valve to the house, but that is pointless, unless you were going to drain the tank totally, to the point that water would run out of the house system. The only other purpose would be if you can't make sure no one is going to draw water while you're doing the process for 10 mins, but for most of us, that isn't an issue. You might also want to have the pump on for a while as you're draining, to try to stir it up.
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On Sunday, August 3, 2014 11:35:18 AM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

have a shut-off installed on the well line entering the house where I forg ot to specify it when the well was drilled. That was an unusual situation though. I had a leak and needed to shut that line off to isolate it.

You are right. My bad. That is a shutoff valve to the house.
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On 08/02/2014 11:42 PM, Harry K wrote:

The well goes _DIRECT_ to the house w/o any intermediary??? That's certainly peculiar--water on demand instead of just hot water.
And, it would seem to be a pretty incompetent installer that would just ignore the obvious despite the "forgetting" in a spec. Would perhaps be a scope change but to not have isolation/cutoff on the house probably doesn't meet Code (presuming there's one applicable in the area which granted may not be in rural area on on well).
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On 8/2/2014 1:56 PM, Michael Wilson wrote:

drain the tank. If I turn off the breaker to the well pump, will this effectively shut off the water so I can drain the tank and replace it? Help much appreciated.

the pressure. Expect to get a little wet, no such thing as perfect.
So, tell us why you're replacing the tank? might be that's not your real problem.
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Christopher A. Young
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