Pressure regulator question

Okay, here you go:
The water coming out of my kitchen faucet blasts out like a fire hose. No other faucet in the house seems to have this problem. Today, I had a plumber over for a different problem, and asked him to render an opinion on the faucet-pressure problem.
He looked into it (I wasn't home when he did his check; the wife had him call me), and said the pressure regulator in between the street service and the house wasn't actually regulating the pressure -- it was letting in 145 pounds (psi?), which is street pressure. I raised the question as to why the other faucets in the house weren't blasting; he says he checked, and yeah, they are all overpressured (I just don't see it -- or, rather, feel it).
The fix, apparently, is to replace the regulator (which would seem to make sense), and also to put some kind of "bladder," or smaller tank, on top of my water heater, so that when water is let into the tank at a specific pressure, and then heated (raising the pressure), it won't blow anything out.
It's this last part especially that sounds fishy. I've never heard of it before, never seen a water heater that has such a device, and the "physics" doesn't ring true to me.
So, what are the expert opinions on all this here? (My wife just phoned again, and this guy wrote on his work order that we should "turn the water off [that's the main water supply to the house]" so as not to risk damaging anything.)
Oh, and if anyone has any ideas on the blasting faucet, I'd appreciate hearing those, too.
Shane
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The other faucets probably didn't show signs of being overpressured because the aerators or built in flow limiters were working on those sinks which apparently they were not in the kitchen sink
The expansion tank may or may not be needed. If you already have a few water hammer arrestors and the hot pipe volume is not too great, you can get by without. Think of the bladder (expansion tank) as a very large water hammer arrestor installed at the supply end of the pipe instead of at the delivery end. Both of these devices allow the water pressure to be absorbed in a flexible component instead of stressing the otherwise rigid walls of the pipe network.
If there is a check valve on the cold supply going into the hot tank (or the new pressure regulator) such that when the hot water expands the additional volume has no where to back out, then you will see a short shot of pressure whan you turn on the tap and then quickly return to normal.

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All correct answers.
New code states that all homes are to have a back flow preventer. So, if the water comes in at lets say 45 degrees and then heats up to 110 in the HWTank its going to expand. Your pressure will rise due to this. If the kitchen sink does not have an aerator it will blow out fast then slow down. Also, faucets in bathrooms actually help control the amount of GPMs allowed, its an energy and conservation design into the facet, which kitchens do not have. Every showerheads flow is restricted by an orifice much like that in aerators.
Now, with a pressure reducer and back flow preventer you must have an expansion tank or you can damage both the reducer and backflow valve. IF your meter has a backflow preventer/check valve in it and you do not have a pressure expansion tank you will be charged for a new water meter by your utility! Also, it is now code that you must have a backflow preventer, some areas are starting to demand proof that they are tested and work by a licensed back flow tester, some every year others every third year. This has been the law for commercial/industrial for some time and it is being implimented for the residential market.
Do what the plumber says and stand there BEFORE he does the work and show him what is happening. If it still does it afterwords tell him to take it off and hit the road. He should have gauges that can show you the actual pressure before and during the water being turned on.
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