Prepping a home to sell

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OTOH, a market like that has a lot of bottom feeders, like myself, who are desperate to get a house that fits their budget. I was specifically looking for a house with good bones, but old everything, because I wanted my money to go toward paying for the neighborhood. The renovations will come later. The house I bought has the original 1958 everything.
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Bottm feeders by description are looking for LOW prices:(
I guess it depends on what you want to sell your home for:(
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Everyone is looking for low prices, actually...
The point I was hoping to make is that hot markets are not just populated with upscale buyers who will turn their noses up at an old kitchen. There are plenty of bottom-feeders who will gladly buy a house without a new kitchen.
The question is not what price you want to sell your house for. The question is what will be the *net* gain from upgrading the house before selling. My amateur assessment is the OP should either upgrade as suits a turn-key buyer or leave it alone.
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says...

There are also people who plan to remodel to get exactly what they want, and don't want to pay for someone else's upgrade first.

Yep. Depends on the market and neighborhood. But there is probably no reason to do a real fancy upgrade beyond what makes a fairly pretty and servicable kitchen. Leave alone, or do a few refurbishments. No remod.
Banty
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Banty wrote:

Yep. I'm one of those. With my last house, the kitchen had been remodeled within the last five years, but I hated everything about it... pinky-tan oak cabinets, white appliances, a strange little range and hood, ornate brass lighting fixtures... I spent two years in that house thinking, "I really hate this kitchen, but it would be such a waste to remodel when it's all practically brand new". That kitchen is one of the reasons I was so happy when we got the opportunity to move :)
When DH and I were shopping for our new house, we deliberately looked for places with older kitchens that we could upgrade/update without feeling completely wasteful. We actually wound up finding a home that had been recently updated by people with our same taste, so we got really lucky there. Both of our runners-up had old kitchens with good layouts that just needed updating (new countertops and appliances, mostly).
I agree with most of the responses here, by the way... double prime the attic, clean clean clean, leave the kitchen cabinets alone except for cleaning and maybe a change of hardware, and either remove the wallpaper or leave it alone. If you really have the time to devote to it, sanding and painting the kitchen cabinets might help, but that's a LOT of work and you run the risk of people like my husband coming through and saying "ugh, I hate painted cabinets". You can't please everybody, but you only really need to please one :)
-- Jennifer
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cas wrote:

I like purple, but would change that to reduce the "ugh" factor.

I would never do that to sell a house, as it is an expense for esthetics not likely to be recovered on selling.

Clean. Reduce clutter. Paint if you love painting or the old paint is damaged.

Vinyl? What have you used? If the surface won't peel off, use coarse sandpaper to score it horizontally. Spray with warm water, let it soak in, spray again, soak again, and start peeling/scraping GENTLY. Wallpaper paste will not soften unless moisture reaches it - that is the secret.

Unless it is horrible, leave it alone. The new wallpaper may rate as "just as ugly".

I last sold a house, it needed paint in the kitchen - faded and worn paint around wall switches, a small stain here and there. Needed reroof. Home was 10 years old, solid and well built. Those qualities are essential and usually very obvious. Realtor said not to worry about cleaning carpet or painting or reroof, and we got a good price. Some folks will be shopping for a house which requires nothing immediate, and some will be shopping for a home that is the right size, style, location and amenities even if it needs new wallpaper.
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I think the reason most here dont believe upgrading is a good idea is very apparent!!
This board is universally populated by the DIY group, and for that reason isnt a good base to ask.
Myself I would rather buy a fixer upper.
My wife on the other hand has NO INTEREST in remodeling.
This became very apparent in orlando florida where we used the last day of our vacation for some home shopping. She wanted a turn key special preferably brand new.
My favorite house was a older one near a dead end street with old stately trees and large lots. My wife didnt like this home, since it had a odor problem and needed work.
I told the realtor pull up and toss the carpets, scrub the entire place, seal all walls and floors, and put in a new kitchen.
realtor responded obviously you have done this beforee, this house will sell slow since only 10% of the market is looking for a fixer upper, and the sales price will be at least 20% under normal value.
For board members here WE ARE THAT 10%, hope the original poster finds his:)
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wrote:

Don't rule out common sense of the DIYer (I'm not a tradesman). I read this thread and see plenty want to save money, time and effort. Maybe from experience they think the local market won't recover the dollars and effort invested. I've made extra efforts to ensure a selling home is "move-in" condition...and it paid well....

A first time buyer may option for a fixer upper. An investor/speculator wants it ready - no hassle.

Good for your wallet, I can't say the same.
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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I think the reason most here dont believe upgrading is a good idea is very apparent!!
This board is universally populated by the DIY group, and for that reason isnt a good base to ask.
Myself I would rather buy a fixer upper.
My wife on the other hand has NO INTEREST in remodeling.
This became very apparent in orlando florida where we used the last day of our vacation for some home shopping. She wanted a turn key special preferably brand new.
My favorite house was a older one near a dead end street with old stately trees and large lots. My wife didnt like this home, since it had a odor problem and needed work.
I told the realtor pull up and toss the carpets, scrub the entire place, seal all walls and floors, and put in a new kitchen.
realtor responded obviously you have done this beforee, this house will sell slow since only 10% of the market is looking for a fixer upper, and the sales price will be at least 20% under normal value.
For board members here WE ARE THAT 10%, hope the original poster finds his:)
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