Preparing for Power Outages?

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And now SBC is hiding behind the AT&T logo to get away from _their_ recent record of poor customer support. They've also sucked in BellSouth, the local Baby Bell, which doesn't have the best of histories.

[ ... ]
When I was still in corporat IT, we had to go to the regional VP level to get some things taken care of with BellSouth. They all have their ups and downs.
Gary
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Gary Heston wrote:

in 1984 judge Green spoke and divestiture of AT&T happened. now AT&T seems to be recollecting their baby bells..

other than being called in on occasion to resolve automated messaging & accounting [AMA] issues with what they thought were lost billing records I never had direct dealings with the bell south account as far as implementing any of the new features or technologies offered to their integrated business networks. there was not a lot happening in their area back in those days.
SBC and PacTel were hot beds for meridian digital centrex. Dallas and Los Angeles implemented enormous IBN networks. of course, you well know all that stuff predates voice over IP.
telecommunications is one area which evolved faster than people could actually consume by firmly grasping an understanding for the usefulness of a new feature. I still LOL thinking about the day we took remote call forwarding to the VP. we implemented our code in the PBX to place a forward on his desk DN to his bag phone and then told him to go and play golf. he had the cutest little silly look on his tech-zero face as he said this could be useful in the best of ways. today the same feature has been refined so as to provide an offering allowing people to merge their residential DN with their cell DN. :)
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Jim wrote:

AT&T Corporation basically no longer exists, at least not in the same sense it once did. In the mid-1990's, it spun off Bell Labs and called it Lucent. It then spun off AT&T Wireless (cell phone division). The company that remained was still AT&T (and they still sold cable television service and long distance service, and even local phone service in some markets), but in 2006, SBC purchased AT&T Corp. The company now calling itself "AT&T" is really the same company that was SBC Corp.
To put this in terms of NYSE stock symbols, T spun off two things, then SBC bought the remaining part of T, then SBC changed its name to 'T' since it now had the rights to use that name.
So, AT&T is not recollecting the baby bells. One of the baby bells collected AT&T.
- Logan
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Yep- one of the surviving baby bells ate mama bell, and then ate one of its siblings. They had all been eating each other for years. I used to have ameritech for an ISP, until SBC ate them and the service went to hell, so I jumped to the ATT-branded ISP. Now SBC ate that, and the service is again on a downward slope.
I think Qwest is the only surviving intact baby bell, IIRC. Once sbc->att eats them, we are back where we started, plus several of the larger independents and numerous ma'n'pa carriers have also been assimilated. Maybe the 'new' att's logo should be a be a borg cube, not that modified deathstar?
aem sends...
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wrote:

Especially in Brown county, IN, where the roads often follow the old deer paths along the creeks in the valleys. Very pretty county, but 'as the crow flies' doesn't mean much there. Sometimes it is a five mile drive to get to the house on the next ridge. The rich people from Indianapolis that build new 'weekend' places on previously undeveloped land, are often shocked at the cost of placing several additional poles to get power back to their new house. Clusters of fancy houses 100 yards apart, and the end of a new road, are pretty common, so they can share the utility and road plowing costs.
But having said that- ATT is also shy about the distances that they will connect to, due to quality-of-service guarantees. Here in SW MI, they use 12,000 cable-feet, IIRC. I had to go with a more expensive 3rd-party DSL, since ATT won't connect out here, half a mile beyond their coverage radius. Not a reseller, someone who has there own server farm next to ATTs CO downtown. ATT hooked up the second pair on my service drop as a dedicated pair between me and the DSL company. Good thing I'll never need a second voice line.
aem sends...
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

That's a laugh. They don't even run it in some CITIES (like Pasadena, for instance) that have AT&T "main offices".
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In Brown County, you don't need broadband. Too much fun available just outside the door. I'm from the counties just on either side of there, so I have spent a lot of time on or near 46- I'd trade this brand new DSL line here in SW MI, for a Brown County address, in a heartbeat.
aem sends...
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"ameijers"> wrote

It IS beautiful here. My regret is that we didn't move here 10 years ago. Yes, I spend quite a bit of time outdoors. Very few people here (15,000 in the whole county) but lots of wild animals. I'm watching 2 squirrels race around a big snow covered cedar right outside my office window right now.
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Don wrote:

Ooo - Brown County! That is some gorgeous country!
AL
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snipped-for-privacy@concord.com (Don) says...

Isn't there anywhere to relocate the dishes? My satellite dishes are installed below the windows on the south side of the house, just above the posies in the flower beds. When it snows, I just walk outside and brush the snow off.
There's still a bunch of prejudice left over from TV antenna days - people think their dish has to be installed on the roof. I had a friend with a perfect location, on the legs of a second floor wooden deck, where all the feeds could be installed in a false ceiling between floors in his house. Instead, he drilled holes in a steel roof to mount the dish, and butchered the finish in a closet to get the feed to the first floor.
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(Don) says...

We're surrounded by tall trees and the dish has to face south. I was told the 2 way internet dishes are more sensitive than the 1 way TV dishes and after having both for almost a year now I agree. Our internet will go out much more frequently than the TV.
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snipped-for-privacy@concord.com (Don) says...

That's because satellite TV is KU band, and satellite internet is KA band. Both of them get absorbed by water, but KA band is absorbed at a much faster rate. Clouds get in the way.
Too bad about the trees. Putting a dish on the roof makes maintenance a bitch.
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(Don) says...

You know it. 2 weeks ago during the ice storm the dish was covered in ice and wouldn't work. No way in hell I was gonna get on that ice covered roof to chip the ice off. So I tried spraying it with the water hose. The temp was so low the water froze as soon as it hit creating 3' long icicles.
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The first thing to do is to decide what you need to have (light, heat, refrigerator, television, airconditioning...) and what you are prepared to pay for it.
22 hours is a little baby outage; you can get by perfectly well without doing anything special. (unless it is below zero, or something odd like that)
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I'm not entirely sure how I'd do an extended outage. The one I had in Seattle this year was tiny compared to my co-workers many of whom were out for 5+ days. There were lots of people sleeping at work, taking showers at the workplace and sending the wife and kids to go see grandma. If I remember right the entire town of Issaquah was out for 3 or 4 days and that town has about 30,000 people.
I've got warm coats, a fireplace, gas heat. So while the furnace might not work as advertised, I'd still have hot water, a source of warmth, and if I needed to keep something cool I'd just put it outside (in the winter of course).
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says...

Television? "Need"? I've never owned one.
Well, OK, I am tempted to buy the smallest, cheapest black-and-white TeeVee that can run on torch batteries. Like six "C" size or whatever. Just to get updates if there is an earthquake, etc.
The only other use for a TeeVee I can imagine is to check out the local broadcast news, to compare their spin to the wider Google News feed.
DVDs would just need a computer without broadcast reception ability.
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 20:44:10 +0000 (UTC), Jonathan Grobe

The last one we had that long here was when it was really cold (icy out). I was glad to have a gas water heater.
BTW, a corded phone helped too (that was not out).

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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 18:47:13 -0600, Mark Lloyd
Good point! Most of my phones say "Western Electric" on the handset and they work fine in the dark.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Let me guess... Black? Rotary dial? With a non-coiled wire to the handset? The kind of phone that will still function even after a noo-cu-ler war?
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 19:19:10 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG

I have a couple black ones but I have some upscale colors and a couple trimlines plus a pay phone out in the pool bar.
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