Preparing for Power Outages?

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I prefer the hand cranked ones - and have had 2 for many years. Carry one of the shake type in my purse - just in case.
JonquilJan
Learn something new every day As long as you are learning, you are living When you stop learning, you start dying

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Neon John wrote:

[...]
The model I have also has an external power port and various adapters to power and charge a cell phone - handy
AL
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Neon John wrote:

Looks like a 3W LED headband light to me.
--
Martians drive SUVs! <http://oregonmag.com/MarsWarm307.html

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"clifto"> wrote

He may have meant this one, down on the bottom of the same page. http://www.amondotech.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 56
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Don wrote:

Thanks, don't know how I missed it.
--
Martians drive SUVs! <http://oregonmag.com/MarsWarm307.html

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I have two deep cycle batteries with small inverters that will run the TV and computer for several hours. I also have a 4 KW generator that will take care of the heat, refrigerator, and freezer; as well as the neighbors.
--
Jim Rusling
More or Less Retired
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During the 2003 power cut, I found one of my major shortcomings was air movement. The gas range did a nice job heating the kitchen, but not any of the rest of the trailer. Since then I've got a trolling battery, and an inverter. So that I can run some low wattage lights, and also fans to move the heat around.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On Feb 25, 5:29 pm, "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-

Kitchen appliances are not designed to heat houses. I hope you have a CO detector and smoke detectors. That way, when your house burns down you can get out safely, then stand real close to the fire to stay warm.
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On 2 Mar 2007 10:52:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@teleport.com wrote:

OTOH, kitchen appliances are not sentenient beings and don't know what they're heating. They'll no more burn down the house heating air than they will heating water, roast beef, turkey, etc.
OTOH2, some DO produce a lot of CO. The propane range in my MH can click off 100 PPM CO in under an hour with all three burners going.
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John De Armond
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Strawman argument. Nobody has said that appliances might be sentient. The argument is about wether or not they are designed to be used to heat a room and they most certainly not.
It won't burn the house down, but you possibly might not live through the night.

Clearly yours has affected you judging by the quality of your post.
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wrote:

My previous place had a gas range, and when I had a power outage in winter that lasted long enough for the place to get cold, I'd use that for heat. I never left it running more than 20 minutes an hour, though, and never while I was asleep. That place was so leaky that I doubt CO buildup was a huge problem.
aem sends....
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I don't care if you used to burn your furniture in the middle of your kitchen floor during outtages. It still doesn't make burning natural gas without a chimney and without tight fuel mixture regulation a good idea. You're the kind of person we read about in the morning papers who did something similarly incredibly stupid using the fact that they it hadn't killed them yet as proof that it was ok.
You really should take your life more seriously. Get a motel room if you're without heat; visit friends or family with a fireplace. Invest in some good sleeping bag.
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So why aren't we reading about hundreds of people dying on Thanksgiving from carbon monoxide poisoning because they roasted their turkeys in gas ranges for many hours? Do you think all these gas ranges have chimneys?
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Jonathan Grobe Books
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Or you could have a CO alarm handy to alert you there are high CO levels. Then you don't have to die.
Besides,if you die,you won't be able to post the results of your test. B-)
--
Jim Yanik
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2007 19:27:21 -0500, Stormin Mormon

There's an invention called the thermostat. A closed oven operating normally will only be on a fraction of the time. A room that isn't perfectly sealed will have enough ventalization.
But, feel free to stick your head in the oven and turn on the gas, given how little you value your life. Hopefully if you don't give a shit, nobody else will.
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On Sun, 04 Mar 2007 14:47:29 GMT, AZ Nomad

Wow, a gen-u-whine card-carrying USDA-Prime *sshole. Don't see many of those anymore now that the garden variety has taken over.
I'm curious Mr. 'hole. If burning natural gas (and propane I assume) without a chimney is such a bad idea they why are there so many gas stoves, unvented heaters, catalytic heaters and gas mantle lights out there, all operating without problems? Tell me that, o' sayer of sooth.
Oh wait. Captain Obvious has arrived with the answer. These devices are DESIGNED to be used indoors without a chimney. They work fine. Thank you, Capt'n...
A few years ago there would still be some uncertainty involved but these days one can know for sure that an appliance is operating properly. One need simply spend (not "invest") less than $50 on a good digital readout CO detector such as a NightHawk.
Having done so 3 times (house, motor home, semi truck cab) I know that my motorhome's propane stove makes enough CO to be dangerous even though it is "properly regulated". I know that my catalytic heaters and my ceramic surface burner heaters (Mr Heater Buddy and Detroit Radiant Heat) emit zero CO within the limits of detection. (I actually know that they emit 0.00 PPM CO, the limit of detection of my fairly expensive industrial detector but that's another story) The residential CO detector is something even a card carrier like you can partake of. Of course, it's easier just to come here and wet yer panties in public than it is to do it right.
Note to other mobile people: The rectangular NightHawk with the digital readout near the top and the "N" cutout over the horn can be easily operated on 12 volts DC. Simply remove the built-in Wall Wart transformer, cut the cord and connect to 12 volts. The wart outputs around 9 volts AC. This hits a bridge rectifier on the detector board and then a voltage regulator. 12 volts DC (polarity doesn't matter) works perfectly.
I've had one connected like that in my motorhome for >5 years and another in my semi truck for the several months I've had it. Much more reliable and MUCH less power draw than an RV-type CO detector.
I have NOT looked at the newer round model but I need to since Sam's Club has quit carrying the rectangular one and that's the only place I knew that sold it for $39 instead of around $50.
John
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wrote:

Thank you for saving me the trouble. Despite AZ Nomad's lecture, I wasn't worried at the time, and would not be worried about it now. This is the same gas range I COOKED on, and that never killed me. Nor did I leave it running for hours, or running while out of the room or asleep. Heat a pot of water, and turn it off till the water got cold again. Yes, I did sleep in a sleeping bag and long johns on those occasions.
aem sends...
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If you are so remote,then why wouldn't it be prudent to have a generator for -some- power,if not whole-house capability?
And can't you get broadband from a satellite in Canada,at least for downloads?
BTW,a car battery and an inverter would power your laptop,or a TV & DVDplayer,maybe a fluorescent light or two.
--
Jim Yanik
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I prepared for this by living in California.
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Gil Faver wrote:

Right, because California is the least likely state to have a natural disaster.
Karen, who lived in the Bay area for 13 years
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