prehung door on 2x3 wall

can i easily modify a new 2x4 prehung door jamb to fit my 2x3 framing? or do i need to special order? thks bill
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bill wrote:

"Easily?" Not really. Prehung units are made to slip together at the jamb and trimming there screws that up. It would be simple enough to trim a 1/2" off each outer side of the frame except it's very difficult to get the casing trim off w/ tearing it up. Unless I had a bunch of them, I'd probably just opt to make the frame for it from scratch as being quicker and simpler. But, I've a full shop--depends on what you have to work with...
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You'd be better off with a slab door, trimmed down to fit snugly in the existing opening.
JK
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The short answer is no. You could add a second layer of 1/2 drywall around the opening in a picture frame effect. Make it something like 6" oversized and edge with L metal. The prehung will now fit, the trim will work, and you have a new accent.
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Yes, it can be done. Easily no.
I had 4 closet complexes where I installed both regular (7) and bifold (3) doors. Not a problem to make your own jambs if you have a table or radial arm saw. Rip to width, cut to length, cut a rabit on the uprights to accept the top jamb.
Of course mortising for the hinges (if any) and latch (if needed) adds a bit of time and fool around. I have done all that in the past with hammer/chisel and a few times with a router.
All those doors were done over a 10 year period rehabbing and old house.
Harry K
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With a prehung unit, remove the door and hinges. Take apart the jambs. remove the stops. Rip the jamb right down the center (where the stops will cover, then rip again to remove the inch (or whatever). Your stop will cover the joint. You might want to preinstall shims perfectly level, since it might be easiest to install the frame in two parts. Not easy, no.
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Why not use biscuit's and put the ripped jamb back together? That would make it easier to install since it would now be one piece again.
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Yes, biscuits would work great if you have access to them. Also, check with a custom jamb order. We used to get charged a measly 15 bucks a door for custom width jambs. Don't know if that would apply to a 3 9/16" jamb or not.
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I see I overlooked the 'prehung' bit. I didn't use them. I find that a new door (no jambs) is much easier to do in that situation.
Harry K
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thanks to all. i will probably go with just the new door in existing jambs and trim, eventhough wife wanted new trim also....may be replace that too...thanks again
On Sun, 9 Dec 2007 18:46:53 -0800 (PST), Harry K

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