Preheating water by running pipes through attic?

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No matter how much insulation is wrapped around a pipe, if the water sits long enough it will acquire the same temperature as the attic air around it.
The purpose of the insulation was not to keep the water cold so that it would be cold when you use it. It was, as you said, to protect against condensation dripping from the pipes and ruining your ceiling.
Robert Scott Ypsilanti, Michigan
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On Sep 26, 7:32 pm, -...@---.--- (Robert Scott) wrote:

That's what I said.
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Running copper lines through the attic probably won't add much heat to the water. Plastic pipe won['t transmit the heat as well making it hardly worth the effort. That said, a holding tank may be a good idea. That way a 10 or 20 gallon supply of water can sit in the attic and absorb heat during the day.
The best method though, is to build where there is no HOA to boss you around so you can build a good solar system.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

If you listen to the caveats from others and use enough pipe, yes, it is certainly possible. Cost effective is something else...
They'd need roughly 100' of 1/2" pipe to hold a gallon of water; however, the pipe need not be in a straight run, it could be in a series of loops like the cooling fins on a radiator.
It would be most effective if there were some sort of recirculating system ...a pump that activates when the resevoir temperature is "x" degrees below ambient attic temperature.
Would it be worth it? Well, 2500 feet of refrigeration style 1/2" copper tubing - enough for 25 gallons - would cost better than $6,000. If there were a recirculating system they'd need a tank and pump but less tubing. Would the cost to run the pump be less than the cost to just heat the water in a tank? No idea but I kinda doubt it.
--

dadiOH
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USE PEX, its cheap!
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USE PEX, its cheap!
Cheap, but has poor heat transfer properties compared to copper.
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Cold water pipe in a hot attic. Condensation on the pipe, and dripping water.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Wed, 6 Aug 2008 08:32:53 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

All of our pipes are in the attic in So Fla and I don't see any condensation but the water isn't really that cold. I can attest that you do get a little burst of very hot water out of that pipe in the summer
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

water like the rest of us. no driving all over the place. no money. welcome to the planet.
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Bob wrote:

Have they considered placing pipe under a black asphalt driveway. My driveway gets so hot you can't touch it. No one will know it's there so HOA should have no problem. I don't know if it would work under a concrete drive.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Heh!
Use the entire attic as a giant collector for solar water heating?
You could get by with a 3x4 box-like thingy.
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I am working on doing this myself. I will use CPVC which can stand the heat. I've placed a remote thermometer in my attic and it gets to be 125 degrees on a day when it is in the 80's outside.
I am going to run say 2" CPVC back and forth in the attic the entire length of the house. With larger pipe, the water will flow more slowly and have a longer period to heat-up.
Then I am going to get a solar water heater circulation pump, controller, and electric solar panel to power it. This will circulate the water into my hot water heater, but it will sense the temperature of the water from the attic as well as in the tank and only circulate the water when the attic water is warmer.
The reason I am using CPVC is I will have to drain the pipes before the 1st freeze and I don' want any rust. So plastic.
Also I will need to run the pipes so all the water can drain out. And I will need to install an air escape to get the air out when filling the pipes in the spring.
So basically the pipes will run back and forth attached to the underside of the rafters and going higher and higher with a gentle slope (for draining). Then air release pipe at the top.
And valves for all this to by-pass in winter, drain, and let air escape.
Also CPVC will expand with heat, so need plastic fasteners which allow the pipe to move back and forth.
Water heater tanks hold heat for a long time. So I am predicting that this will provide all the hot water I will need. I will basically turn off my hot water heater and will be able to turn it on only as needed. FYI - I've noticed that I am happy with shower water being about 102 degrees.
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don't forget the consider the weight . when you're hanging it and what not.
s

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might consider PEX with basically no joints, little chance for leaks, easy to install, just spool out.
add disconnect so you can blow compressed air thru lines each winter before freezing, no sloping of lines necessary, plus PEX is basically freeze proof.
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Hell, really for the application, it could be left coiled up.
s
might consider PEX with basically no joints, little chance for leaks, easy to install, just spool out.
add disconnect so you can blow compressed air thru lines each winter before freezing, no sloping of lines necessary, plus PEX is basically freeze proof.
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On Aug 6, 6:50�pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

yep way less work, no joints to leak, and check home depot, PEX is dirt cheap
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On Wed, 6 Aug 2008 18:45:29 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I don't know if I would want all that water in my attic.
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On 08/06/08 10:47 pm metspitzer wrote:

I don't know whether design/construction practices in UK have changed over the decades, but the houses there with which I was familiar all had storage tanks -- insulated to some degree -- in the attic. The only "tap" ("faucet" to LeftPondians) fed directly from the incoming water supply was one over the kitchen sink for drinking water. The storage tank fed the other cold-water faucets and the water heater. Open top -- or maybe with a loose cover -- and a float valve. I'm guessing that they held 40 gallons or so -- real gallons, not the four-fifths-sized US ones.
Perce
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I would suggest that you will need a tempering tank up there, and for that I would suggest you may also require some structural re- enforcement to make it safe. Only the water in the attic would be heated and it would need to sit in the pipes for some time to actually warm up. Even then you would not be absorbing much heat.
Frankly I doubt if it would be worth the bother, cost and risks involved, even assuming there would be some reduction to the amount of heat going into the home in the summer reducing the cooling expense.
How about ground thermal? Do they have that option?
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If they were putting in as many energy saving things as they could they wouldnt need the utility co, it would be solar.
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