Precision of engineering helps bottom line (washer broke 2 wks out of warranty).

Just two weeks after warranty on our G.E. Profile washer expired, it broke. Seems like pump does not work, there is a faint 60 Hz sound from inside the washer when pump is supposed to pump, but no pumping takes place.
I find this "coincidence" an evidence for intentional design where stuff is made to break after warranty, for extra "revenue" to be made on easy repairs and parts.
i
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Ignoramus4760 wrote:

Every moving part wears at some rate. Every part that wears will fail at some point. Therefore, one piece of information that is _always_ included in the specification given to the engineering team at the start of a project is a design lifetime. Without that there is no way for the engineer to select materials, machining tolerances, surface finishes, lubricants, etc.
FWIW, I recently had a garbage disposal fail two weeks before the warranty ended. The company replaced it free including installation. Sometimes you win and sometimes...
--
.Bill.

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I'd be amazed that the engineering could be that precise. As for the two weeks contact your deal and they may cut you a break since it is that close.
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I had a Maytag dryer blow its circuit board 2 days before the warranty expired, they came out and replaced it at no charge.

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wrote: ...

Coincidence is just that...like most any other thing (except the children in Lake Woebegone) for there to be an average lifetime, some must be longer and some must be shorter.
Or, to put it in more scientific terms, "stuff happens"...
As Edwin says approach the retailer and hopefully they'll cut you a break...
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Go to HH Greg or such, find the Scratch & Dent stuff, pick the ugliest one, have it delivered. Repeat every two years and thank the Democrats for forcing Global Trade down our throats. (Didn't you think I could turn the thread political?)
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Ignoramus4760 wrote:

washer. I've got a service manual and intend to keep my 1981 Whirlpool until I die. I've got a spare, though, a Maytag Performa that someone tossed out when only 4 years old. It took 2.5 hours to fix it, no parts needed.
--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
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On Tue, 29 May 2007 06:45:01 GMT, Gary Brady

Shoot, man. Just get yourself a scrub board and a galvanized bucket. Last you the rest of your life.
Bruce in Bangkok (brucepaigeatgmaildotcom)
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"Gary Brady" wrote:

Yep, same here. I recently had an opportunity to pick up a two year old washer for a song and a dance, but I decided to keep my late 70's Kenmore (rebadged Whirlpool) instead. I replaced the water pump in it about 15 years ago, and it shows no sign of slowing down - the thing is built like a tank.. I've seen new ones leaking transmission fluid straight from the factory - NO THANKS!
They really don't make 'em like they used to.
Jon
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Even worse on new dishwashers. Those damned vinyl pump boots _always_ perforate in two to four years.
LLoyd
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I have the 1977 Kenmore ( Whirlpool) and I never even had to change the pump. 2 months ago I did have to change the drive belt, I was mildly peeved that it only lasted 30 years :o) I do however have to take the pump apart every 6 months to remove lint as I removed the lint filter after the 3rd one broke ( replaced with a 49 cent PVC elbow). The good news is that the pump CAN be dismantled, the new ones are fused so you can't take it apart. How about those tools that had a command in the firmware to kill the tool after so many cycles? Not sure if this scandal was for a tool or an appliance.
Show me anything new and I will pin point with a high degree of confidence where the obsolescence is planned. The weak links are now so flagrant that it's obvious that they couldn't care less if we know.
Real sad news this past month. Maytag had the gall to pull out the lonely Maytag repair man. Pffffttttt I guess it's not everyone who reads Consumer Reports ( awesome magazine by the way.) They are now topping the recal lists ( that's right, more than one appliance. )
Claude Montreal.

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On Mon, 28 May 2007 20:24:19 -0500, Ignoramus4760

or the biro knib you lost in the wash last night jambing it :-)
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wrote:

Maybe, maybe not. With minor repair, could last another decade. The sound/no action could be just a slipped-off belt. Investigate and correct, or get a repairman in. Theorizing about engineering strategies and who-makes-a-profit isn't getting the clothes washed.
In a perfect world, one could find a quality product and be loyal to the manufacturer. Here and now, it's near impossible. That great pair of shoes from four years ago? Not available in that 'model' anymore. The stereo that worked so well? Company was bought out. Vacuum cleaner that was so convenient? New model is built on completely different principles (and there's a $50 set of filters that needs annual replacement).
At least the manufacturer still stands behind my Betamax. And DOS 3.2 works like it always did. Not.
Go ahead and let the manufacturer sell you parts. And pay the service person. It won't make the service guy rich, nor break you. After the year of warranty, when maintenance sets in, the responsible party is... you.
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