Pre-stained wood

Is it possible to get pre-stained wood ??
I have two room dividers, each about 4 foot long and 3' foot high that would look better with a 6" top. Rather than trying to stain my own and hope to get the right finish, it would be easier to get pre-stained. Anyone know where to get it ??
I would really be nice to match all the stair rails, bannisters and similar wood trim in the house using the same stained woods... Any thoughts here ??
Thanks in advance for your suggestions !!
Peter
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I've never seen such a thing and doubt it exists. There are hundreds of stains available so matching can be a problem if you don't know what is on the wood now. You'd have to have the stain for touchup anyway since it is only a surface treatment, the raw wood will show where it is cut.
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Thanks..... what options are available ?? Here's what I have
House stairway with a 8' stair bannister, a 3' stair rail with spindles, leading to a hallway with two 4' dividers that I'd like to top off with a 6" top, trimmed with moulding and finished with casing or crown where the top meets the dividers.
So we're looking at refinishing a
8' Bannister rail (two and one half inch) 3' of Stair rail top moulding 2 - 4' x 6" pieces for topping the dividers assorted casing or crown moulding for the divider tops.
Not a large amount of surface.
The bannister can be stripped. Lumber for the divider top can be either pine or hardwood (not purchased yet). The finish casing/crown would be pine. The stair rail is already finished and would be a pain to disassemble and strip.
So different woods, some finished some plain.... I seriously doubt that I am capable of obtaining like finishes using stain.
Are there paints, or finishes, or other methods that would give a stained 'woodwork' appearance without looking like someone went wild with a brush. Would 'spray work better than 'brush' ???
I'm not interested in bringing out 'grain' or wood beauty or pine 'knots' but want to achieve a 'uniform earth tone' on the wood without making it obvious that it's painted.
Am I overlooking something very obvious ??
Thx....
Peter
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spindles, leading to

trimmed with

dividers.
pine or

The stair rail is

'woodwork'
'spray
'knots' but want

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What I *think* you are looking for might be achieved by using a base paint and a glaze and then covered with a varnish. The base could be brushed or sprayed. The glaze could be brushed and a grain-like appearance could be achieved with a little practice. It could be thinned as needed. Depending upon what you use for the glaze (oil base might be easiest to work with because it has a long open time to work with and can be wiped off it it doesn't look right) you can either brush or spray with a compatable varnish when it's dry. I suggest testing your clear final finish because some finishes such as lacquer can react to oil finishes and turn into muck. Shellac will go over most glazes but it's a bit tricky to work with (for me, anyway). Shellac can also be used inbetween the glaze and lacquer etc to help prevent or reduce a bad reaction. It can also be used if you have a problem with and old finish bleeding through a new finish.
I like to make my oil-based glazes with good quality artist's oil paint, a little linseed oil, a bit of turpentine, and sometimes a drop or too of cobalt dryer. In some cases, where there is not much traffic, you could get away with not using a clear overcoat, but you mentioned a banister so that rules that out. Varathane (spelling) is very durable but I've not used much varnish and there's probably something better these days.

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Since some it pine, stick with pine rather than spend the extra money for hardwood that won't match.
Given the different items it would be difficult to get them all the same with stripping and stain. I'd take a trip to the paint store (a real one, not Home Depot) and se what is available for faux finishes. I've seen some done that look very much like wood, very eye pleasing. They probably have just what you are looking for and the tools to do it.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.net wrote:

Using different woods but the same stain is likely to give you wildly different results. Pine would soak up a lot more stain and be darker, probably, than harder woods (like maple, oak, etc.) Best would be to identify the wood that is most important and take a sample to a good wood shop or paint shop. The only hope, IMO, of matching your already finished wood is to have an expert mix and test a stain on a similar wood. Good paint stores might do so.
The box stores that sell kitchen cabinets sell moldings that go with the cabinets. You might find a close match that way, buy some moldings and the stain that goes with them.
From your questions, you don't sound experienced in painting or wood finishing. If you want the same color and don't care about the wood, a paint with a glaze over it might satisfy. Glazes can be applied to closely resemble wood grain, but it takes practice and some understanding of color. Good luck.
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If you could find wood already stained, it would be unlikely to match what you already have. The variables are too great.
Take a sample of your bare wood and your already-finished wood to a good paint store and ask them to match it. I use Sherwin-Williams, and they do a great job. They'll even tell you exactly how to do things once you get home.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Thanks everyone, for your help .... at least now I have a direction to go in..
okay.... nix on the idea about getting prestained anything.... it doesn't exist... I can stop looking... thanks !!
There is a local Sherwin Williams that I purchase my house paint from... they're pretty knowledgeable people...
The idea of a base, glaze, and top coat sounds like the best way to go.... as the finish sits on top of the wood. Shouldn't be too difficult to mix a close shade and test it out on scraps, then do all the work at once.
Seeing this will take some time and effort, might as well look at some of the faux effects to see if any are more appealing than basic wood tone.
Thanks again all, for your help and assistance... Thanks to you,... there is a solution !!
Peter
On Wed, 18 Feb 2009 09:04:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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