Practically, what is the difference between a "cut resistance" of 8, versus 9, in a Master Padlock?

A friend just called from a store to ask what's the difference (practically) between a cut resistance 8 versus 9 in a Master Padlock.
Two #9s are $19, while a similar set of four #8s for $25.
From a practical standpoint, do you have any experience to share to help drive one to that type of decision?
Note: I will google but she's on the line now! (and, I know nothing about this stuff)
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On Wed, 04 Dec 2013 12:55:05 -0800, Oren wrote:

If you were locking a gate, and a shed, and a few other things, would you think an almost doubling in price between the two worth it?
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Danny D'Amico;3160601 Wrote:

Danny:
I'd say the difference between an "8" cut resistance and a "9" cut resistance is about half a minute. This web page from Master Lock explains cut resistance:
'Master Lock - Choose the Best Padlock - Master Lock' (http://www.masterlock.com/cms/keying/best_padlock )
The thicker and harder the material the padlock shackle is made of, the higher it's cut resistance. Less expensive padlocks will have thinner shackles made of ordinary chrome plated steel. Better padlocks will have thicker shackles made of much harder steels so they're more resistant to being cut.
But, the bottom line is that if someone has an 24 Volt cordless angle grinder fitted with a metal cutting abrasive disk, they're going to cut through any shackle on any padlock within a few minutes at the most.
So, if all you have is a lawn mower in the shed, I'd say you should buy a weather and corrosion resistant padlock to minimize the chances of it rusting inside, and tho he11 with it's cut resistance because an angle grinder will cut through any padlock shackle.
--
nestork

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On Thu, 05 Dec 2013 04:15:48 +0100, nestork wrote:

What I gather from this, is that my friend should go with the cheaper locks.
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On 12/5/2013 3:58 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Far as I know, all the usual Master padlocks can be opened without damaging the lock.
There are padlocks where the key can't be removed when the padlock is open. Some or all of these are not subject to the same method of attack.
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Before looking at a higher cut resistance lock, look at what it is locking. It may be easier to cut the hasp than the lock.
One day at work I needed to get into a room that was locked with a padlock. Could not cut the lock with some 3 feet long bolt cutters it was so hardened. Moved to the side of the lock and cut the hasp very easy.
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On 12/04/2013 10:43 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

When people are trying to make things secure, there is so much over-looked.
For example, near my house someone has a very sturdy security door. I am sure it would be very hard to break into it.
However directly next to their door is an unprotected window. It would take a burglar 3 seconds to get into the house.
I was temped to put a sign on the door reading:
BURGLARS:
Door is locked, Please enter through window.
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On Thu, 05 Dec 2013 07:05:09 -0600, philo wrote:

:)
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BURGLARS:
WE DO *NOT* CALL 911
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It really gets down to how much noise they can make. A battery operated side grinder will make short work of any padlock. I also understand if you freeze one of those super hard locks, they will shatter when you hit it with a hammer.
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And how often do burglars try to shoot the lock off, not counting television?

They make inexpensive "cover"s that go over the top part of a disk lock, you know, one that looks like a frisbee. I've never seen them for sale but maybe on the web. My friend who ran a ministorage gave me one. The lock can still be cut off with a angle grinder but it's harder I think, and even harder to get bolt cutters in there.
Her ministorage had no security. Anyone could drive in anytime, day or night, but burglaries were almost always by friends of the renters, or cohorts in some illegal business like drugs. Total strangers didn't come there to break into storage lockers. Maybe they know thaty most contain mostly junk that people can't part with.
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On Thu, 05 Dec 2013 19:36:10 -0500, gfretwell wrote:

I suspect most thieves will prefer not to make all that much noise. And, I suspect whatever is fastest, and easiest to carry, is what they'll use.
A 48" bolt cutter is probably fast and quiet though.
I only have a 24" bolt cutter (I needed to cut a chain on my property when I bought the place); so I'm not sure what a 48" one would do.
Would it basically open all the locks we'd normally buy?
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I know one one lock that a good quality 48" bolt cutter would not cut, but it cut the hasp the lock was holding .
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On Fri, 6 Dec 2013 01:00:21 +0000 (UTC), Danny D'Amico

How thick, compared to the locks we'd normqaly buy, was the shackle of the lock you cut open? Was it marked "hardened"? Was it a name brand (meaning if they said hardened, it really was.)?
48" gives twice the pressure that 24 does. Maybe a lot more if it opens so much wider that you get to use different muscles to close it. But its jaws have to be as hard as the shackle. I don't think those cheap Chinese bolt cutters, also about 24", I bought from JCWhitney 20 years ago were high quality. I bought them because they were so cheap.
BTW, can one un-harden a shackle by heating it with a propane or MAPP gas torch?
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