Powered crimping tool equivalent to COPALUM tool

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Small lugs and connector pin crimping tools, such as those by AMP and Amphenol for signal cables (e.g. 18 AWG and smaller) also create 'coldweld' crimps, using just hand tools. But for anything larger such as 12AWG and larger, I think you'd pretty much have to use something with a lot of mechanical advantage such as hydraulic.
daestrom
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the bottom line is that for the type of aluminum wire that is a problem, there is no real good solution. the tool is indeed never sold (only rented) and only rented to electricians and then only after you take a class and get certified to use the tool (and probably sign a bazillion waivers).
there are some wire nuts available that have some antioxidant compound in them but purportedly they are not a good solution either.
since you mention canada, i gather you are there and there are no certfiied users there anymore. that should tell you a lot.
the aluminum wires now in use are a different alloy than the small gauge wiring that caused some fires a few years back, so the tool used for that particular wiring is probably not appropriate for what you want to use it for. utilities do not use small gauge wire in any case.
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john weaver had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-Powered-crimping-tool-equivalent-to-COPALUM-tool-21503-.htm : Harry Email me at snipped-for-privacy@tycoelectronics.com if you have any questions on Copalum or termination methodology
All, you should all know that in this business, you do get what you pay for. Cheap connectors are cheap connectors. Been in this industry for long enough to see the tricks people play.
Thanks John
daestrom wrote:

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I didn't see your previous post, but if you are joining two dissimilar metals, be sure to use a joint compound to prevent moisture from touching the connection. If you were to join copper to aluminum with no means of preventing moisture from bridging the joint, corrosion loss will occur over time. This is the accelerated corrosion (loss) of the least noble metal (anode) while protecting the more noble (cathode) metal. Copper, in this example, is the more noble metal.
The aluminum will pit to the copper leaving less surface area for contact. The connection could be become loose, noisy, and even allow arcing. These corrosion problems can be prevented by using a joint compound, covering and prevent the bridging of moisture between the metals. The most popular compounds use either zinc oxide or copper particles embedded in silicone grease. As the joint pressure is increased, the embedded particles dig into the metals and form a virgin low resistance junction void of air and its moisture. My electricians use nolox, but I'm sure there are other brands out there that work just as well.
just my .02 S.

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